"go steady on me"

annaaa

New Member
Poland, polish
Hi everybody

Can you tell me what " go steady on me" means? It's from the song "Wiseman" (James Blunt) :

"She said to me, "Go steady on me.

Won't you tell me what the Wise Men said? ..."


Is it like : "trust me", or "be nice to me" ??? Or has it something to do with dating (to go steady= to date regularly (on= with (??)) / to see sb (??)
Well, I've no idea...:confused:

Thank you very much

annaaa
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    You can read the entire lyrics here: http://www.absolutelyrics.com/lyrics/view/james_blunt/wisemen/

    This expression is certainly not idiomatic, in my experience, and, after reading the entire song, I can offer no definite answer. My best guess is "be honest/frank with me." In this sense, the phrase "go steady on me" would almost be a parallel to the more idiomatic "level with me." (which means "tell me the truth")

    To "go steady with someone" means to date them regularly, but this does not seem to apply here.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Hi everybody

    Can you tell me what " go steady on me" means? It's from the song "Wiseman" (James Blunt) :

    "She said to me, "Go steady on me.

    Won't you tell me what the Wise Men said? ..."


    Is it like : "trust me", or "be nice to me" ??? Or has it something to do with dating (to go steady= to date regularly (on= with (??)) / to see sb (??)
    Well, I've no idea...:confused:

    Thank you very much

    annaaa
    Go steady on me = (sort of) To play by the rules
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "go steady on" has a little over 700 hits on Google, and the majority of these seem to refer to other contexts/uses.
    "go steady on him": 2 hits
    "go steady on her": 3 hits
    "go steady on you": 1 hit

    I don't include "go steady on me" because the song lyrics would distort any results. Clearly this construction is very uncommon. It sounds very close to "go steady with," but this is not likely what the lyricist meant, who I'm sure has a sufficient command of the English language to know that he used a non-idiomatic expression. In other words, if what he meant "date me" or "see me exclusively" or "go steady with me," that's what he would have said.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Here is something I've just found:

    go steady vt. To be in a monogamous, heterosexual relationship, with the intention of marrying the other person. This is neither as formal, nor quite as serious as getting engaged, and also does not imply that the two people live together.
    American-Australian Slang Dictionary

    But in the lyrics we have go steady on me, so I'm not quite sure if it's really this meaning. It may indeed be being honest with someone as mentioned by some other members.


    Tom
     

    annaaa

    New Member
    Poland, polish
    thanks a lot

    I see, it's probably: "be frank with me" because of:

    "She said to me, "Go steady on me.
    Won't you tell me what the Wise Men said? "

    I didn't realize it at the beginning

    annaaa
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Here is something I've just found:

    go steady vt. To be in a monogamous, heterosexual relationship, with the intention of marrying the other person. This is neither as formal, nor quite as serious as getting engaged, and also does not imply that the two people live together.
    American-Australian Slang Dictionary

    But in the lyrics we have go steady on me, so I'm not quite sure if it's really this meaning. It may indeed be being honest with someone as mentioned by some other members.


    Tom
    I am standing by my post, gentlemen :cool:

    You "go steady on me" then you won't "end up like them".
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I am standing by my post, gentlemen :cool:

    You "go steady on me" then you won't "end up like them".
    Hm... Don't playing by the rules and being honest with someone imply, more or less, the same please?

    Tom
     
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