go to a barbeque

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AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hello,

A conversational English course uses the phrase below as one of activities you could do on the weekend.
go to a barbeque
To have a barbeque is something I can naturally understand whether you organize it or invited to, but to go to a barbeque is not clear to me. You could go for a walk, go shopping, or go to a store are all common and clear. When I hear "to go to a barbeque", there is a sense of being invited or going to a place known of making bbqs, and you get to buy barbequed meat or chicken, but I do not see a sense of organizing one as a possibility.

What does "go to a barbeque" exactly mean? The use of the preposition "to" is confusing me.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    A barbecue is an event at which food is barbecued. You can "go to a barbecue" in the same way that we "go to a party" or "go to a funeral" (other types of events).

    Edit: the comments below about the spelling of "barbecue" are, of course, quite right. I plead mea qulpa.
     
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    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    A barbeque is an event at which food is barbecued. You can "go to a barbeque" in the same way that we "go to a party" or "go to a funeral" (other types of events).
    Thank you, Glenfarclas.
    I see, now. A natural question could follow: where? And an answer could be: at Glenfarclas's. What do you think of that, Glen?
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    A barbecue, as it is used here anyway (in this thread), essentially is a party. It is typically, in Australia but elsewhere too, a casual social gathering of friends, colleagues or family with a focus on relaxing outside, on the deck or in the garden, and on eating barbecued meat and salads. So, just like you go to a party, you go to a barbecue.
     
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    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It is indeed accepted in Australian English too. I was only expressing a personal preference. For example, one of the leading sales outlets for barbecue equipment here is called “Barbeques Galore”.
     

    AntiScam

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    A barbecue, as it is used here anyway, essentially is a party. It is typically, in Australia but elsewhere too, a casual social gathering of friends, colleagues or family with a focus on relaxing outside, on the deck or in the garden, and on eating barbecued meat and salads. So, just like you go to a party, you go to a barbecue.
    Thanks a lot. I like your answer, Orble.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    To have a barbeque is something I can naturally understand whether you organize it or invited to
    This can only mean you are hosting it.

    “To have a barbecue” = “to host a barbecue”
    “To go to a barbecue” = “to attend a barbecue”
     
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