go to sightsee/sightseeing, and swimming too

yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! Do the sentences "She went sightseeing" and "She went to sightsee" mean the same thing?
-What does she do?
- She went sightseeing/to sightsee.
 
  • yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello,

    I would expect to hear "She went sightseeing". "She went to sightsee" doesn't sound right to me: I don't think I've heard it and I couldn't say it myself.
    Hello,
    Ok, what about "She went to swim/swimming"?
    Could it be the answer on the question "Where is she? also"? Or it is the answer to the quesrtion"What does she do?"?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello,

    I'd say "She went swimming" - but "went" suggests a completed action in the past to me, so "went" cannot be part of the answer to "Where is [present] she?" in my usage. "What does she do?" is not a question about the present but a question about habitual behaviour.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No, that doesn't work (To yakor, not to sound shift)
    I cannot think of an occasion when I might say "she went to sightsee". That seems a particular characteristic of "to sightsee" - we don't seem to use the verb, but we do use the gerund.

    Swimming is different "she went to town to swim" but "she went swimming". You need to have a purpose to say "to swim". It could stand alone, but as an answer to a question:

    "Why did she go to town?"
    "She went to swim." (or more naturally "To swim.")
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    N

    Swimming is different "she went to town to swim" but "she went swimming".
    What do you mean? I can't get this sentence.
    "she went swimming" and "she went to swim" have different sense?
    "She went swimming" means "She swam"?
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello,

    I'd say "She went swimming" - but "went" suggests a completed action in the past to me, so "went" cannot be part of the answer to "Where is [present] she?" in my usage. "What does she do?" is not a question about the present but a question about habitual behaviour.
    ok, "what is she doing?" How to answer correctly? "She is going swimming"? (she is on the way to the river to swim)
    "Where is she?" "She has gone to swim" OR "She has gone swimming"? What is correct? What is the difference between these two answers?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "She went to swim." The purpose of her going was to swim.
    "She went swimming." She undertook the recreational or sporting activity of swimming.
    The first describes a purpose, the second describes an activity. That applies to any action verb (I think, and not including sightsee).
    So
    "What is she doing?" "She is going swimming."
    "Where is she?" "She has gone swimming."
    "Why has she gone?" "She has gone to swim."

    "She went swimming" may be equivalent to "She swam", but that depends on context. We would normally use "went swimming" to describe a recreational activity and "swam" as a simple description of the activity.

    PS I have edited the thread title
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Andygc, thank you for edit of the title and your paticipation in my thread. You help me very much, but I'm afraid I'm still having a difficulty with the use of "go" and the "ing" form together:confused:.
    "What is she doing?" "She is going swimming."
    It means she is swimming in the river already, just now or she is only going to swim?
    "She went swimming" may be equivalent to "She swam", but that depends on context.
    Which way? One example to see it, how that depends on context.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi yakor

    "What is she doing?" "She is going swimming."
    It means she is swimming in the river already, just now or she is only going to swim?
    No, it means that she is going somewhere to have a swim.
    Let's try to find the differences.
    She is going to the river to swim - the reason for the going is the swimming.
    She is going swimming in the river. She is going from one place to another, and when she gets there she will swim. It's much the same in meaning as "she is going for a swim". We use this construction all the time - she is {going for a swim}{going swimming} - going running, going walking, going shopping, going drinking, going clubbing, going sightseeing.

    Which way? One example to see it, how that depends on context.
    She went swimming in the river = she swam in the river.
    She went swimming across the river - she swam across the river - do not necessarily have the same meaning. The first is a little strange, and it could have more than one meaning, but "she swam across the river" can only mean that she swam and in doing so crossed the river. The same as he walked across the road, she walked up the stairs, they walked down the street.

    The first - She went swimming across the river - could, for example, mean that she went swimming and the place she chose was across the river - she didn't swim across, that's just where she was. Trying to find all the possible contexts for "she went swimming across the river" which might change the meaning slightly could be a complicated exercise.
     
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