go to work every day in a different country

dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.

Other people live in a country but go to work every day in a different country. In Europe, workers regularly commute between Brussels, London and Paris.

Shouldn't it be "...go to work every day to a different county"?
Thanks in advance.
 
  • dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks, Vektus.
    Actually the sentence is from a text-book and its author is an American. I don't remember to have come across 'in' used with movement verbs (in this case 'to go'). Anyway I'd like to hear from English natives what they think about 'in' in this contex.
     

    Vektus

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Well, "to go to" already takes place here: to go to work, but I'd prefer one more "to" as you see) In case of Americans everything is possible, that's doesn't sound really awful actually. Maybe the work that is situated in a different country is meant.
    I'd like to listen the natives too.
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If the first sentence stood alone (without "En Europe, people...) I would understand it this way:
    Many people, (every day new people) go to a different county to stay and work there. But the context proves that it's not the case.
    A wonderful situation: two Russians have an nice conversation with regard to the use of prepositions in the English language with no native jumping in :)
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Second thoughts:
    May be we should look at it this way:
    They go where to? [kuda?] -to work [na rabotu]
    The work is where [gde?] - in a different country [v drugoi strane]
     

    Lyndon

    Banned
    N/A
    We go to a place: we don't go in a place. (*)
    We work in a place; we don't work to a place.

    You already have 'to' as part of 'go to' and you don't need to repeat it.


    * ('Go into a place' has a different meaning = enter).
     

    Vektus

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I've already noticed that ;)
    Well, as you mentioned it's an American, everything stood on its place. But this preposition here sounds rough for me and so... Russian.)
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Well, as you mentioned it's an American, everything stood on its place.
    Even natives make mistakes that's why I doubt everything I'm not sure about :)
    My problem was that I understood 'go to' as [edut rabotat'] instead of [edut na rabotu]
    True that in Russian in both cases we would say [v druguiu stranu], but in English, as it turnes out, they use 'in' (preposition of place) in this case (with 'work' (noun) [rabota]). It's like in the example with the pub.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The problem is that "[They] go to work every day in a different country." has two interpretations but both mean the same thing.

    1. "[They] go to work [work=noun] every day in a different country." = "[They] go to their place of work every day in a different country." with this, to the preposition of direction.
    2. "[They] go to work [work=verb] every day in a different country." = "[They] go to do their jobs every day in a different country." with this, the to is the preposition attached to the infinitive.

    The other problem is the "every day" should be at the end.

    "[They] go to work in a different country every day." - this way, the ambiguity does not matter - they are working in a different country, or their job is in a different country.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    'They go to work in a different country every day' can also mean that on day one they work in France, on day two in Botswana, on day three in Tuvalu, and so.

    How can this anbiguity be addressed?

    I agree; that was actually how I read it when I saw the title of the thread. It would mostly be fixed by writing "... go to work every day in another country." If one had to be really precise, then one could say "in a second country."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top