godder--fighting against a godder takeover

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I see--not hear-- this occasionally, but don't find it in any dictionary (except Urban). Are AE speakers hearing it? Is it used in BE? I understand it as a derogatory term for a person of strong and strongly expressed (Christian?) religious beliefs

Hate Mail/NormalBobSmith.com


[Gore Vidal:] Either way, the days of the quiet, nice atheists is past, in my opinion. I think this is a time for atheist evangelism. We're either fighting against the godder takeover, or we're hastening the long-overdue death of that dangerous ... belief system.


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In Memoriam: Gore Vidal, atheist, humanist, intellectual - Democratic Underground

1. But the sky-godders do not give up easily. In the 1950s they actually got the phrase In God We Trust onto the currency, in direct violation of the First Amendment.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I'm an AE speaker, and I've never seen it. Probably only athests use the term, and only when talking to other atheists. Clearly it is a derogatory term for non-atheists.
     
    I was a big fan of Gore Vidal and read his stuff all the time and enjoyed watching him on his TV appearances. He was very witty and intellectual, quick to laugh. I think his term "sky-godder" is a term invented by him and doubt very much that it's in current use by other atheists, or ever was.

    Of course, ancients all over the world looked up to the sky where they believed "the gods" lived, and religions that became and are monotheistic still have people looking up to the sky during prayers, etc.

    So if there are "sky gods" or a "sky god", than any one who believes such a thing would be a "sky godder":) in his acerbic description and opinion.

    Yes, a derogatory usage.

    (I believed him, though, when he said he wasn't at all bothered by what other people believed or did not, but became enraged when their beliefs became political to the point of certain practices interfering with the separation of Church and State, one of the founding notions of the U.S. Constitution.)
     
    I'm an AE speaker, and I've never seen it. Probably only athests use the term, and only when talking to other atheists. Clearly it is a derogatory term for non-atheists.
    Doji and Dale, you may well be right about who uses the term. But the term 'wetback' is in the dictionary--among dozens of disparaging terms. So your point doesn't go to inclusion in a dictionary-- or does it?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Doji and Dale, you may well be right about who uses the term. But the term 'wetback' is in the dictionary--among dozens of disparaging terms. So your point doesn't go to inclusion in a dictionary-- or does it?
    If it is rare, perhaps used mostly by Gore Vidal himself, there is no reason for it to be in a dictionary.

    Every year millions of new words or phrases are created and used by someone. They only enter dictionaries once their use is widespread enough that dictionaries consider them "part of the language". So out of those millions-per-year, only 10 or 20 per year get added to dictionaries.
     
    If it is rare, perhaps used mostly by Gore Vidal himself, there is no reason for it to be in a dictionary.:thumbsup:

    Every year millions of new words or phrases are created and used by someone. They only enter dictionaries once their use is widespread enough that dictionaries consider them "part of the language". So out of those millions-per-year, only 10 or 20 per year get added to dictionaries.
    :thumbsup:
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I've never seen or heard of it either. I've seen "God-squadder" used very occasionally, but never "godder".
     
    Incidentally, I note that sometimes the term is neutral, not derogatory, as in the phrase 'big Godder' (who has views about an all powerful; all-embracing God, according to a sophisticated conceptions).

    Final Call - Page 168

    isbn:0891077960 - Hledat Googlem

    Steven J. Lawson - 1994 - ‎Snippet view

    Oh, you didn't fail," Wilson explained. "I always come to hear my former students speak one time. I simply want to know if they are a big-Godder or a small-Godder. I am very pleased that you are one of our few graduates who is a big-Godder.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Isn't that different, benny - doesn't it divide as {big-god}der, {small-god}der?
     
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