Godspeed! : Do you say that?

Englishmypassion

Senior Member
India - Hindi
Dear, Forum,
Yesterday, I came across the word "godspeed", used by a boss to wish good luck to one of his subordinates leaving the organization. The mail ended with "Godspeed!"
I looked it up in the OED, which labels it dated, and I guess it's an AE usage. Do you still use/hear the word? Did you yourself use/hear it in the past?



Thanks a million.
 
  • Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Well, an Indian boss said that very seriously in his email just yesterday.:D

    I'm relieved to know that, eb, because I didn't know the word. Thank you very much.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Was the employee going on a journey, or just leaving the organisation?

    I find it even more unusual to use "Godspeed" if he wasn't planning on a journey. I can imagine someone of a religious bent saying it to me maybe if I were setting off on a long and hazardous trip (to the North Pole, perhaps:D).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I like more unusual words, and so I have to confess to using it. I know it is old fashioned, but I like to use it as a kind of blessing. It needn't be confined to a journey ('speed' means 'success', as in 'More haste, less speed'), and the OED gives a quotation from 2007:

    2007 Philadelphia Daily News (Nexis) 21 Nov. 4 Negotiations generally close out with a godspeed and good luck.
    Did you consult the OED or some other Oxford Dictionary? The online OED doesn't label it as dated.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Ah, that's Oxford Dictionaries, rather than the OED, which is a subscription-only site.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    But we don't have to subscribe to that here in India -- it's available for all to use online. Probably they know you are quite rich and that Indians really need a subsidy. :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You're talking about Oxford Dictionaries. I'm talking about the OED, based on a 20-volume dictionary. My university subscribes to it, which is why I get access to it.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't suppose anyone's seriously said that in two hundred years.
    Well, the moon launch was a while ago, if not quite 200 years:
    As the powerful rocket thundered away toward the Moon, the last words they heard from Launch Control were: "Good luck and Godspeed."
    Probably because of this, I associate the word with very important moments. I've never used it seriously.
     

    francoe

    Member
    Argentina - Español
    Actually, on El Camino, A Breaking Bad Movie, when Ed leaves Jesse Pikman in Alaska says: "godspeed to you".
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Well, the moon launch was a while ago, if not quite 200 years:

    Probably because of this, I associate the word with very important moments. I've never used it seriously.
    Which is exactly why I wouldn't say "Godspeed!" to someone who is about to go on a relatively mundane trip.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It comes up in some well-known songs, such as

    'Unchained melody': I need your love, Godspeed your love to me
    'Lara's Theme'/'Somewhere, my love' (Dr Zhivago): Lara, my own, think of me now and then; Godspeed, my love, till you are mine again.
     

    Emma Neve

    Senior Member
    Italian
    That expression was used in a notorious tweet (in 2018 I guess) by Sarah Jessica Parker:
    "Dearest Kim, my love and condolences to you and yours and Godspeed to your beloved brother."
    Kim Cattrall did not take that very well!
     
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