going back/went back

Discussion in 'English Only' started by lingkky, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    You were the one who went back earlier yesterday.
    Vs
    You were the one coming back earlier yesterday.


    Are they correct? Are they have the same meaning?
     
  2. Retired-teacher Senior Member

    British English
    It is difficult to answer without context. What is the situation?
     
  3. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Yes
    No.

    I am not sure if you are asking about
    (i) "went" and "came" or
    (ii) "went" and "coming" or
    (iii) "the one who" or "the one",
    and I am not sure if "earlier" is an adverb qualifying "yesterday" or "went/coming."

    It is simpler without "back earlier":
    You were the one who went yesterday. -> You were the one who left this place yesterday.
    Vs
    You were the one coming yesterday. -> You were the one who arrived at this place yesterday.

    With "back earlier"

    You were the one who went back earlier yesterday. -> You were the one who left this place and returned to the place from which you/we had come earlier yesterday.
    Vs
    You were the one coming back earlier yesterday. -> -> You were the one who arrived at this place from the place to which you had been earlier yesterday.
     
  4. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    #1 is OK, but clumsy. I assume it means "yesterday, you were the one who went back earlier (than I did)"

    #2 is not very good, and it doesn't have the same meaning as #1. It sounds like it means "yesterday, you were the one who was intending to come back earlier".

    The key difference I see is between "went back" (in the past) versus "coming back" (in the future).
     
  5. And it's "Do they have the same meaning?" not "are.":)

    (cross-posted)
     
  6. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    “Yestersay,you were the one leaving earlier than me."

    Is the sentnece correct grammartically?
     
  7. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    I am sorry that I gave the wrong sentence to be discussed.

    It should be
    "Yesterday, you are the one going back early.”
    .. vs..
    "Yesterday, you were the one who went back early.”

    Are they correct grammartically?Do they have the same meaning?
     
  8. Retired-teacher Senior Member

    British English
    "Yesterday, you were the one who went back early" is fine. The other one is not correct.
     
  9. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    Referring the idea given from post 3 by PaulQ,it should be correct. Why is it wrong since the sentence structure provided previously (post3) is same at all?
     
  10. Retired-teacher Senior Member

    British English
    I don't think PaulQ put "you are the one . . . " in any of his sentences.

    "You are the one (who will be) going back earlier" can only apply to a future event and so "yesterday" is inappropriate.
     
  11. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    From you point,continous tense only accepted for future.
    So the sentence below would be wrong?
    "The people living in this area were poor ."
    (Incorrect)

    Like that?
     
  12. Retired-teacher Senior Member

    British English
    That sentence could be correct if talking about the past but "The people who used to live in this area were poor" is better.

    "The people living in this area are poor" refers to the present.

    Edit. I suppose that "You are the one going back earlier" could apply to the present but it sounds odd.
     
  13. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    How about if I change it to be

    "The people living in this area were poor.But,they are rich now due to the development of economic in this area. "

    Can "people living in this area" in the sentence above mean "the people who is living in this area now "?

    Is my sentence correct?
     
  14. Retired-teacher Senior Member

    British English
    Yes, that's O.K. (with slight revisions). "The people living in this area were poor but are now rich due to the economic development in the area".

    Edit. What has this got to do with the OP?
     
  15. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    Hmm, let's look at these sentences:

    1. You were the one coming back earlier yesterday.
    As I mentioned previously, this is correct, but it's not the best. It sounds like you are saying:
    Yesterday, you were (in the past) the one who was intending to come back earlier (in the present).

    2. Yesterday, you are the one going back early.
    This is not correct.
    Yesterday, you are (this action doesn't happen in the present, it's still in the past, so should be were) the one going back early (in the present).

    3. The people living in this area were poor.
    This is correct. The people were poor in the past, but they aren't poor anymore.
    The people living in this area (in the present) were poor (in the past).

    Of course, if you intended to say something different from what I outline above, it might be incorrect...
     
  16. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    no.2
    "you were the one going back early.”
    To confirm again, does the sentnece have a meaning.Sorry for asking agian.What is the real meaning?Does it work?
    Can someone a clear explanation about it?I am still confused.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
  17. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    I think Retired_teacher's question deserves an answer. What are you trying to say with these sentences?
     
  18. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    I just want to know the meaning of the sentence alone.
    “Yesterday,You were the one going back early”

    I got it by editing “yesterday,you were the one who went back early.“

    I wonder the edited sentnece can mean something in English by the sentence itself?
    Is it correct grammartically?
     
  19. You don't seem interested in following the WR rule of supplying context which you agreed to do when you joined us here.
     
  20. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    sorry for that.I would like to provide a context.My friend and I attended a party together yesterday.I left a message to him.as shown below.

    I could not find you at the end of the party yesterday.I.think “yesterday,you were the only one coming.back early. “Did you?

    can it function to mean“Yestersay,you were
    the one who went back early .”?
    or it has other different meaning there?
     
  21. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    No, these are still slightly different. And the construction could be a bit better.

    Yesterday, a friend and I went to a party. I thought he was coming back early, and wanted to know if he did. I would ask (today):
    Did you come back early yesterday?

    You used this sentence: Yesterday, you were the only one coming back early. Did you?
    I see that as meaning Out of everyone who went yesterday, you were the only one who said he was coming back early. Did you come back early?
    Using the only one implies we're comparing your actions to more than one person. And in your sentence, I think saying the only one who was coming would be technically better.

    With this sentence: Yesterday, you were the one who went back early.
    I see that as meaning You and I went to the party. You left early, and I didn't.
     
  22. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    You used this sentence: Yesterday, you were the only one coming back early. Did you?
    I see that as meaning Out of everyone who wentyesterday, you were the only one who said he was coming back early. Did you come back early?


    I cannot unferstand this part of your explanation.“you are the only one he said he was”
    what does it mean?“he” refers to??
     
  23. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    "He" is "you". Unless "you" are a woman, then it would be "she". I'm not sure which to use! ;)

    How about this instead: Out of everyone who went yesterday, you were the only one who was coming back early. Did you come back early?
     
  24. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    someone told mecontinous tense“coming back”in that sentence structureis can only be in present.
    In your explanation it is in past.Is it correct that continous tense“coming back“ can be in past in the sentence you have given?
     
  25. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    I'm a little rusty when it comes to technical discussions like this. But I don't think that "coming back" is a past continuous tense here. I think it's an expression of the future, as seen from the past, if that makes any sense! In other words:

    Yesterday (in the past)
    you were
    (in the past)
    the only one who was
    (in the past)
    coming back early (in the future, at that time)

    Another example. Yesterday, I told you that I would be working today. I said to you yesterday, I will be working tomorrow. This happened yesterday, so I use will be working, which is the future tense. Today, I am not working. You say to me Yesterday, you said that you would be working.

    Yesterday (in the past)
    you said that
    (in the past)
    you would (in the past)
    be working (in the future, at that time)

    Hope that helps?
     
  26. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    You said that“coming back” is in the future

    “Yesterday, you were the one coming back early."

    Is “coming back” about the decison made in the past for the future?
    Is it correct to think that it is about a decision to come back early in the future or present time?
     
  27. Scott AM

    Scott AM Senior Member

    English - Canada
    Yes and yes, so long as that is what you mean to say.
     
  28. lingkky Senior Member

    chinese
    Thank you very much.I am clear now.
     

Share This Page

Loading...