going on

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yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! Could one use "go on" in the sense of "to continue" like
1) After breakfast, we went on to walk.
2) After breakfast we was going on to walk.
3) After breakfast we was going on our walking.
4) After breakfast we went on our walking.
5) We was walking for two hours. After breakfast we had a rest and then we was going on. (or went on?) Which is correct?
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yakor, you have given us too many choices here. Also, you haven't told us which one you would pick and why. Those are the rules here. Please tell us which one you would pick and your reasoning for it. It helps understand any underlying confusion.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It helps understand any underlying confusion.
    I think only 5) example is correct.
    -After breakfast we had a rest and then we went on. (not "was going on") But I'm not sure why. Maybe, "go on" is not used transitively ? Also< i'm not sure, why one can't use "was going on" in sense "was continuing"
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    No, I'm afraid it's not correct.
    In the first sentence (#5 has two sentences), "was" is wrong, since "we" is plural. We were walking . . .
    In the second sentence, we wouldn't say "we was going on" OR "we went on". We'd say, "we continued walking".
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I wouldn't completely rule out "went on", even though it wouldn't be my first choice:

    We were walking for two hours. After breakfast we had a rest and then we went on.

    I'd be more likely to say "and then we carried on". Another possibility is "and then we went on our way".

    I'd say "and then we continued walking" if I were speaking or writing in a more formal style.

    Ws
     

    spilorrific

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In AmE, we do not use "carried on / carry on" as much as BE speakers, yakor. We use the very "continue" or, even more often, the verb "keep." We kept walking...
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    That's an interesting one, spilo. I'd say "we kept walking" if we hadn't stopped for breakfast and a rest:
    We had walked for two hours, and needed a rest. But we didn't have time, so we kept walking.

    An AmE/BrE difference, maybe? (Or perhaps it's just me).

    Ws
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you all for answers. In the sentense "After breakfast we went on a walk", is "on" a separate preposition before the noun "a walk" or a particle of the phrasal verb "went on"?
    Could one use the phrasal verb "went on" transitively with an object?
    "and then we went on our way" Does "went on" mean "to continue" here? Or it means "we steped on our way (road)? ("on" is a usual preposition before the "our way"?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    After breakfast we went on a walk. :arrow:Here on is a preposition.
    After breakfast we went on.:arrow:Here it is a verb phrase.
    After breakfast we went on walking. :arrow:Verb phrase again.

    Yes, the verb phrase "went on" means "continued". It is the past tense of "go on".

    Use with object? Let me look it up.

    In the WE dictionary page for "go", you can scroll down to "go on:" with several definitions for the phrase. It says it can be used with no object, or followed by "to" and a verb, or followed by "verb-ing". So those verbs (infinitive or gerund) are the only "objects" allowed.

    That "ing" definition says: "to continue: (example) Go on working."
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In the WE dictionary page for "go", you can scroll down to "go on:" with several definitions for the phrase. It says it can be used with no object, or followed by "to" and a verb, or followed by "verb-ing". So those verbs (infinitive or gerund) are the only "objects" allowed.
    What does "WE" mean here?
    If the ing form used with "go on" as an object, and "on" is an adverbial-phrasal-verb particle, could one use the ing object between "go" and "on"?
    -After breakfast we went our walking on?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Sorry, I meant to type "WR dictionary". If you type "go" in the Dictionary search box at the top of this forum page, it takes you to:

    go - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    On that page is a section labelled "go on:" with definitions of the 2-word phrase.

    After breakfast we went our walking on?
    This sentence doesn't work. The form is "go on walk-ing" or "went on walk-ing". The dictionary writes it as [~ + verb-ing].

    To use this form, your sentence would be written: "After breakfast we went on walking."

    I should not have used the word "object" for infinitives/gerunds after "went on". That was my mistake. The dictionary says they can be used after "went on" (in the bold syntax above), but it does not call them "object"s.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The ing form after the verb "continue" is not the object too?
    "we continued walking"
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Would it be correct to say walked on instead of went on in the above example? If so, would it mean the same thing?
    Yes, you could. It would mean the same thing in that sentence.

    "Went on" implies that you used whatever method of traveling you were using before.
    I stopped for gas, and then I went on. (driving a car)
    He got back on his horse and went on. (riding a horse)
    And so on.

     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you very much, Cagey. I'd like to ask just one more question. If I said went on walking or carried on walking, would it also mean the same as walked on?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    went on walking or carried on walking focus on your continuing to walk.

    Walked on focuses on your leaving that place to walk somewhere else.

    (I hope that explanation is clear.)
     

    Fredziu

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you, Cagey. I'm still not sure if I get it. If I say that someone went on walking, could it mean that they didn't really leave the place, but walked close to that place, without making any progress on their journey?
     
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