Going out of the house he locked the front door.

  • Ahyeon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Actually, we locks the front door and leave the house. So we have the below sentence:

    He locked the front door and left the house. We can construct a participle clause like this, 'Having locked the front door, he left house'

    I'd like to know is if the above sentence is possible in English: 'Going out of the house he locked the front door'. Thank you very much!
     

    Ahyeon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Going out of the house he locked the front door

    First of all, don't native English speakers find this sentence to be strange? Is it understandable. I wanted to know if it is a good sentence for a Participle construction? Logically, having locked the front door we leaves our house. So is the above sentence an understandable sentence? 'Going out of the house', is it a good participle phrase? I think that 'locking the front door he left the house' is strange, but that 'Going out of the house he locked the front door' seems possible. But I'm not sure because I'm not a native English speaker.
     
    Last edited:

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I get the feeling you want to express this meaning using a participle construction :)
    'Going out of the house, he locked the front door.'
    I agree that this sentence sounds strange, almost as if he locked the door as he was going out through the door :)

    'Having locked the front door, he left the house.'
    That's better, but now we have the action of 'he left the house' happening after he locked the door, whereas we tend to think of leaving the house beginning when he's inside and ending when he's outside.

    'Locking the front door, he left the house.'
    This seems to say that while locking the door he left the house - focus on locking the door.

    'He left the house, locking the front door.'
    Just changing the order. This sentence tells us that he left the house, locking the door in the process - focus on leaving the house.
    That's my preferred version :)
     

    Winstanley808

    Banned
    English - U.S.
    Since we all know the sequence, open door-walk through open door-close door-lock door, I don't think any of Panjandrum's sentences would confuse a child (at least one in the middle grades of elementary school), much less an adult. Ditto with the OP sentence. I think a comma should be inserted in the OP sentence after "house," mostly because if I were saying the sentence out loud, I would pause after "house" to take a quick breath. Otherwise, it's a long uninterrupted sentence. There might actually be a rule about putting a comma there, among the several rules about placement of commas.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'm sure there is a rule about the comma - no doubt to do with separating the participle phrase from the rest of the sentence.

    And yes, of course sensible people will understand any of a number of sentence variants. But what I am looking for is a preferred form, the most natural form, the form that a fluent English speaker is most likely to use.
     

    Rakshit

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    "Going out of the house he locked the front door": Is this a good English sentence?
    No,probably it was an example of poor English grammar...
    You can write like this:
    1)He locked the front door and left the house.
    2)While Locking the Front door,he lefts the house.
    3)He lefts the house after locking the Front door.
    Thank you
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But what I am looking for is a preferred form, the most natural form, the form that a fluent English speaker is most likely to use.
    There are lots of possibilities. Whether one of them is the most natural is difficult to say. None of the forms that I would consider using is a participle construction, however, so I am unable to choose between different participle constructions.
     
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    Ahyeon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    There are lots of possibilities. Whether one of them is the most natural is difficult to say. None of the forms that I would consider using is a participle construction, however, so I am unable to choose between different participle constructions.
    Thank you very much, panjandrum, Winstanley808, Rakshit! And thank you, sound shift. sound shift! Could you please explain concretely? Do you mean 'Going out of the house, he locked the front door.' is acceptable to you?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Your second and third proposals are not correct. It would be best to state that these are
    your opinions and that you are not a native speaker.

    No,probably it was an example of poor English grammar...
    You can write like this:
    1)He locked the front door and left the house.
    2)While Locking the Front door,he lefts the house.
    3)He lefts the house after locking the Front door.
    Thank you
     
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