going <to> home, visited <to> Spain

pubwie

New Member
English - Afrikaans
I'm going to Spain tomorrow. The last time I visited Spain it was great. After that, I will go home.

Why don't English speakers say


  • 1. I'm going to home.

  • 2. I have visited to Spain.
"To" would be a preposition, right?

  1. Home ( Adverb as it describes the "going", therefore no need to add the preposition = I'm going home.
  2. What would the rule be here?
  • No "to" because __________ = I have visited to Spain.
  • Why would it work to change visited with gone? = I have gone to Spain.
Thanks in advance
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Expressions with 'home' without a preceding preposition are idioms, which means there's no logical explanation.
    If it is not an idiom, go + to is usually an expression of movement. 'Visit', the verb, takes a direct object and isn't regarded as a verb of movement.
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    English - SSBE Standard British
    Verbs of movement - from one place to another - are generally followed by 'to': go to Spain, fly to Spain, move to Spain, drive to Spain, travel to Spain and so on. In all of those cases, we are focusing on your movement from one country to another: presumably from your home country to Spain.

    'Visit' is not a verb of movement. You visit Spain the same as you see Spain: this does not refer to the journey from your home country to Spain as the examples above do. When we say I have visited Spain, you are referring to what you did once you were in Spain: sightseeing and so on.

    'Home' is an adverb, like 'away', 'abroad', 'upstairs', 'downstairs' and so on. We say I went home in the same way as we I went abroad, I went away or I went downstairs. These adverbs give information about the direction of movement and already include the idea of 'to'. This applies to other verbs of movement, also, e.g. I came home, walked home, I ran home, I drove home and so on.

    NB Note that this only applies when the home in question is the subject's own home. If you're talking about someone else's home, the word 'home' is a noun - not an adverb - and it does require 'to' e.g. I wanted to see Tom, so I went to his home.
     
    Last edited:

    pubwie

    New Member
    English - Afrikaans
    Verbs of movement - from one place to another - are generally followed by 'to': go to Spain, fly to Spain, move to Spain, drive to Spain, travel to Spain and so on. In all of those cases, we are focusing on your movement from one country to another: presumably from your home country to Spain.

    'Visit' is not a verb of movement. You visit Spain the same as you see Spain: this does not refer to the journey from your home country to Spain as the examples above do. When we say I have visited Spain, you are referring to what you did once you were in Spain: sightseeing and so on.

    'Home' is an adverb, like 'away', 'abroad', 'upstairs', 'downstairs' and so on. We say I went home in the same way as we I went abroad, I went away or I went downstairs. These adverbs give information about the direction of movement and already include the idea of 'to'. This applies to other verbs of movement, also, e.g. I came home, walked home, I ran home, I drove home and so on.

    NB Note that this only applies when the home in question is the subject's own home. If you're talking about someone else's home, the word 'home' is a noun - not an adverb - and it does require 'to' e.g. I wanted to see Tom, so I went to his home.

    That is a great explanation. Thank you for taking the time :)
     
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