gone yesterday morning

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Muhammad Khatab

Senior Member
Classical Arabic
What is the meaning of "gone yesterday morning" in this context?
It was gone yesterday morning when she finally finished talking to Ben.
Thanks in advance!:):)
 
  • Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    When she finally finished talking to Ben yesterday morning, whatever 'it' is had gone somewhere, or had vanished.
    I don't think so, Heypresto! Look at this example: "it was gone summer by the time the plantings were ready."
    I think it means that she finished talking to Ben after yesterday morning. Since "gone" is a preposition which has the same meaning as "past".

    Here is the context I found on Google: It had been gone midnight when she had finally finished talking to Ben.
    Do you think I'm right?
     
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    Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    That is how I understood it, Muhammad: gone is a preposition meaning after.

    However, it does sound odd to me in this sentence. Gone in this sense is usually followed by a clock time: It's gone six o'clock.
    Thanks for your confirmation!
    But is it understandable by native speakers, although you say it's odd?

    That is how I understood it, Muhammad: gone is a preposition meaning after, as in It's gone six o'clock.

    However, it is a bit confusing in the sentence of #1, without context.
    Do you think "be gone" can be followed by any time expression?
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I would say the use of "gone" to mean "just after" is common only in some dialects. I don't hear it much, nor do I use it. To me, yes, it seems odd.
    Unless HP's guess in #2 is right, I guess the meaning is that, yesterday morning, she had been talking on and on at poor old Ben, and didn't stop until the morning was almost completely over, and Ben was in need of a strong cup of coffee.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Ah, OK, I see it now. I agree with se16teddy's suggestion that we'd expect a specific time after 'it was gone'. It sounds strange in the OP.

    If it had said 'It was gone 11 when she finally finished talking to Ben.' this thread would probably have been somewhat shorter. :)

    Either way - poor old Ben indeed.
     

    Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    I would say the use of "gone" to mean "just after" is common only in some dialects. I don't hear it much, nor do I use it. To me, yes, it seems odd.
    Unless HP's guess in #2 is right, I guess the meaning is that, yesterday morning, she had been talking on and on at poor old Ben, and didn't stop until the morning was almost completely over, and Ben was in need of a strong cup of coffee.
    Thanks for your explanation!
     

    Muhammad Khatab

    Senior Member
    Classical Arabic
    Thanks guys!
    But i think I have seen a lot of time expressions after "be gone".
    And here is a sentence that causes me a lot of confusion: "my baby is gone eleven weeks old." What do you think of it?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    What is the meaning of "gone yesterday morning" in this context?
    It was gone yesterday morning when she finally finished talking to Ben.
    Thanks in advance!:):)
    Where did you find this? I know everyone has worked hard on establishing that gone = past, but even with "past" in there the time reference is very improbable. If we start a sentence "It was gone ... " then the time point is usually quite precise, e.g. "It was gone 11 yesterday when ... "

    I cannot imagine why anyone would say "yesterday morning" there. It is too vague for the job.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Please be careful to note the source when you use examples from the internet, or anywhere else.

    By 'source' we mean specific information like the name of the website or the book, etc, where you saw it, as well as the name of the the author, if that information is available. It should tell us something about the variety of English it represents, and whether the author is a native speaker of English.

    When we are discussing colloquial usage, as this seems to be, it is important to know where it was found. For one thing, it's possible that not all examples are using the phrase in the same way, so things will be confused if people try to explain them in a single explanation.
     
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