good as <a> math(s) teacher

Rizan

Senior Member
India-Hindi/Urdu
1) None of you is good as a math(s) teacher.

2) None of you is good as math(s) teacher.

Which one is correct? I mean, do we need the article "a"?
 
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  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, we do. Sentence (2) is incorrect, but (1) can be improved, either by adding "any" or "very" before "good", or by changing the expression to "is a good maths teacher".
     

    Rizan

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi/Urdu
    Yes, we do. Sentence (2) is incorrect, but (1) can be improved, either by adding "any" or "very" before "good", or by changing the expression to "is a good maths teacher".
    With the informal "are", would you say this:

    None of you are any good as maths teachers.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    None of you are any good as maths teachers.
    I would decide this "as" sentence was too confusing, and say it in a clearer way, avoiding "as".

    None of you are any good at teaching math.
    None of you would make a good math teacher.
    None of you are good math teachers.


    Sentences using "as" in this way are often confusing.
     

    Rizan

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi/Urdu
    I would decide this "as" sentence was too confusing, and say it in a clearer way, avoiding "as".

    None of you are any good at teaching math.
    None of you would make a good math teacher.
    None of you are good math teachers.


    Sentences using "as" in this way are often confusing.
    Is this possible:

    None of you would make good math teachers.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    None of you are any good as maths teachers.
    It doesn't sound very good. You can use 'are' with 'none' but if you use 'neither' (which would be better), you should only use 'is'.
    Even if you use 'are', the 'as' phrase would work better in the singular.

    But I agree with dojibear that avoiding an 'as'-construction is probably a good idea here.
     

    Rizan

    Senior Member
    India-Hindi/Urdu
    None of you would make good math teachers. :tick:
    None of you would make a good math teacher. :tick:

    I think "teachers" is more common, even though "a teacher" seems more accurate.
    One more question: Is this sentence correct, without "would":

    None of you makes a good math teacher. (probably a little too direct??)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    There is a difference not only in tone or "directness", but also in meaning.

    Without "would", they are maths teachers already, and are being told that they're not very good. It also doesn't sound very natural.

    With "would", they are not maths teachers yet, and are perhaps thinking about pointing their careers in that direction, but are being told that it would be a waste of time.
     
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