(good/great) bargain / deal

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, let's say a software developer has just announced that they are going to offer their flagship product for only $45 (regular price is $80) for three days only.
So you share this information on an online forum and one of its members replies by saying one of the following.

1. $45? That's a bargain.
2. $45? That's a good bargain.
3. $45? That's a great bargain.
4. $45? That's a deal. :cross:
5. $45? That's a good deal.
6. $45? That's a great deal.


Except for #4 (which I think doesn't work) and #3 & 6 (in which the speaker obviously thinks $45 is an amazing price), how different are the other three answers (1, 2, and 5) in terms of nuance? If someone said #1 and another person said #2 or 5, which of them do you think are more impressed by the price?

Edit: I changed the discounted price from $20 to $45, because $20 would undoubtedly be a great bargain for everybody!
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Only 1 is good. There’s probably no such things as a bad bargain, so a “good bargain” doesn’t sound right.

    But you could say “a real bargain”.

    5 and 6 are no-nos because of the meaning of a good deal/a great deal as a large amount.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Only 1 is good. There’s probably no such things as a bad bargain, so a “good bargain” doesn’t sound right.

    But you could say “a real bargain”.
    So...why is "great bargain" not good?

    5 and 6 are no-nos because of the meaning of a good deal/a great deal as a large amount.
    Yes, I thought about that. But before starting this thread I visited a Japanese site where native and non-native teachers answer questions from Japanese English learners, and an American teacher recommended both "great deal" and "good deal" among other versions, so I thought maybe they would work.

    Perhaps more in BE than in AE. In the context of prices and purchasing, I didn't think of that meaning.
    Ah, thanks for chiming in and mentioning this. :)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    So...why is "great bargain" not good?
    I’m sure it’s fine. It’s just that I tend to think that something is either a bargain or it isn’t – i.e. there aren’t really degrees of bargainity! :D

    Incidentally, I’ve just noticed that in Oxford’s list of actual usage examples for bargain, “real bargain” crops up four times, “great bargain” once.
     
    I think all three can work, and all three are said.

    I'm not sure I would call the following just "nuances", because I think the meanings are different.

    real bargain = a legitimate, genuine bargain (as opposed to those offers which claim to be but in actuality are not, in the judgement of the speaker)

    great bargain = one that is big in its impact on cost savings

    good bargain = one that just mildly impacts cost saving

    (The real and great bargain versions tend to be proclaimed with vocal enthusiasm, whereas the good bargain version might might not always carry that intensity.)
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    good bargain = one that just mildly impacts cost saving
    Yes, that's what I thought and that's why I asked the following question in the original post.
    If someone said #1 and another person said #2 or 5, which of them do you think are more impressed by the price?

    To me, "That's a bargain" (with no adjective) and "That's a great bargain" don't seem very different from each other (and that's why I think lingobingo thinks "great" is unnecessary), while "That's a good bargain" suggests that the speaker isn't very impressed by the price (he just thinks the discount rate is reasonable). I think this applies to "That's a good deal" as well.
     
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