Good Morning / Afternoon / Evening / Night

rino delbello

Senior Member
italian
Le Gallois bilingue with Hello used at anytime are you referring to the informal, formal greeting or both?
 
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  • brit66

    Member
    English - British
    Hi there!

    Since I have to give a presentation, I was wondering whether any of you could give me some clear guidelines on how to determine when to say "Good morning / afternoon / evening / night everyone", i.e. what time each one begins and ends. I suppose (an hope) I won't have to use "night" at all. Here's my assumption:

    Good morning:5 AM to 12 PM or 00:00 to 24:00
    Good afternoon: 12 PM to 6 PM (?)
    Good evening:6 PM to 10 PM
    Good night: 10 PM onwards (or when you go to sleep, in fact ,or say goodbye for the rest of the day)

    Thank you!!!

    Mara.-
    Good morning: when you get up/wake up to 12 PM - even before 5am if you are up and have the kettle on...
    Good afternoon: 12 PM to 6 PM yes, that's right
    Good evening:6 PM to bedtime
    Good night: when you or they go to bed
    That's right for the UK at least. Definitely good night for when you think they are going to sleep or the day has ended and there is no more evening activities ... You can say goodnight when someone is going to bed at 9pm. You can say good evening when somebody is up and about and doing stuff at 10pm.
     
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    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi All

    With reference to the last post, could you please make it clear if Good afternoon can be used both at 12 and 12.01 without any difference or if it's more correct to use it from 12.01?
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Nobody is that precise. It's not at all unusual to hear a speaker at a conference say "Good morning" after midday, especially if the morning session runs from 09:00 to 12:30. Nobody is going to jump up and interrupt them to say "It's 'Good afternoon', you fool!" At a conference, "Good afternoon" is used for the period following lunch. "Good evening" might creep in at 17:00. None of these expressions has a fixed time period.
     
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