Good morning

  • mortar and pestle

    New Member
    USA
    Tagalog-English, Philippines
    Tagalog: Good Morning - Magandang Umaga
    Good Afternoon - Magandang Tanghali
    Late Afternoon - Magandang Hapon
    Good Evening - Magandang Gabi

    :)
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Japanese: おはよう(ございます) - ohayō godzaimasu
    Mandarin: 早上好 - zăo shăng hăo
    Latvian: Labrīt.
    Lithuanian: Labas Rytas
     

    ameana7

    Senior Member
    Turkey, Turkish
    Turkish: Günaydın.
    It is different than "good morning" (iyi sabahlar); because it means literally "the morning shines". :)
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    Dutch goedemorgen / goeiemorgen
    Persian صـبـح بـخـیـر (sobh bekheir), lit. may (the) morning be good

    Groetjes,

    F
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    German: guten Tag :cross:
    Czech: dobrý den
    Danish: goddag :cross:
    The Germans and the Danes do distinguish between "Good morning" and "Good afternoon" so I'd stick to this difference.

    German: Guten Morgen.

    Danish: Godmorgen.
     

    avalon2004

    Senior Member
    UK- English/Spanish
    Catalan: Bon dia
    Basque: Egun on
    Greek: Καλημέρα [kaleeméra]
    Icelandic:
    ðan daginn/dag
    Welsh: Bore da
    Swahili: Habari za asubuhi
    Quechua: Wuyunus diyas (pronounced similar to "buenos días")
    Indonesian/Malay: Selamat pagi
    Swedish:
    God morgon
    Polish:
    Dzie
    ń dobry [jen' dóbree]
    Zulu:
    Sawubona (one person), Sanibona (2+ people)
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    Isn't it interesting that in romance languages (all of them?) you never say "Good morning" and in English "Good day" is used in a totally different meaning.
     

    avalon2004

    Senior Member
    UK- English/Spanish
    Isn't it interesting that in romance languages (all of them?) you never say "Good morning" and in English "Good day" is used in a totally different meaning.
    I was also thinking this.
    I suppose it is quite logical to say "good day" rather than specify that it is morning because you are referring to the upcoming day...
    "Good day" is never really used now in English, not even by the upper class! A lot of people tend to simply say "morning", but I rarely hear "good afternoon" being used other than in school or meetings etc.
     

    spakh

    Senior Member
    Anatolian Turkish
    Bosnian:dobro jutro
    Norwegian:god morgen, morn
    Garifuna:buiti binafi
    Slovak:dobré rano
    Tamil:kaalai vanakkam , Tzutujil:sakari
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    The Germans and the Danes do distinguish between "Good morning" and "Good afternoon" so I'd stick to this difference.

    German: Guten Morgen.

    Danish: Godmorgen.
    If this is so, the Czech example Kraus gave may be wrong too.

    Den means day in Czech

    The word for morning in Slavic is (y)utro. So "Good morning" should be something like *dobro utro
     

    Henryk

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    The Germans and the Danes do distinguish between "Good morning" and "Good afternoon" so I'd stick to this difference.

    German: Guten Morgen.

    Danish: Godmorgen.
    Correct, it's not quite equivalent.

    Afrikaans: Goeie môre.
     

    parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    Isn't it interesting that in romance languages (all of them?) you never say "Good morning" and in English "Good day" is used in a totally different meaning.
    Well, then Romanian (which is a Romance language too) seems to be an exception as "dimineaţa" in "bună dimineaţa" means "morning". So the Romanian expression translates exactly into the English one.
     

    Honour

    Senior Member
    Türkçe, Türkiye
    Turkish: Günaydın.
    It is different than "good morning" (iyi sabahlar); because it means literally "the morning shines". :)
    Uhm, may I make a tiny correction.
    I suppose it literally means something like "day shiny" ;) .
    (I presume it is a shortened form of may the day shine. )
     

    Lexy82

    New Member
    Polish, Poland
    Polish:

    Good morning / Good afternoon - Dzień dobry (od "Dzien dobry" without using Polish letters) - literally speaking it would mean "Good day"
    Good evening - Dobry wieczór (or "Dobry wieczor" without using Polish letters)
     

    bb3ca201

    Senior Member
    English/Scottish Gaelic, Canada
    We Gaels say "Madainn mhath". Quite a mouthful to look at, but really easy to pronounce: "Ma-tayn va". If you want to add "to you" (as in "Good morning TO YOU"), then you add

    dhut (GHOOT) if you're speaking informally, or
    dhuibh (GHUIV) if you're being polite.

    The "GH" sound is gutteral, almost like a gurgle.

    Not so hard, eh?
     
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