goodbye (forever)

< Previous | Next >

Erebos12345

Senior Member
Canadian English
Which languages have a unique way to say goodbye (forever) to a person (or a thing or something more abstract) you know you'll probably never see again. Perhaps something you'd say to yourself just after someone's death. "Goodbye dear friend. May you rest in peace."

Goodbye in English doesn't necessarily mean forever, of course.

Chinese has 永别, used when you part ways with someone forever.
永 yong3-forever (in this context)
别 bie2-separate (in this context)

Thanks
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Which languages have a unique way to say goodbye (forever) to a person (or a thing or something more abstract) you know you'll probably never see again.
    Italian does.

    Addio*: goodbye (forever)
    Arrivederci
    **: goodbye (for now), basically a formal way of saying see you (later) (which incidentally also contains an element connected to "seeing" just like arrivederci).

    * Etymology of addio: from a Dio (“to God”), from Latin ad Deum (compare Portuguese adeus, French adieu, Catalan adéu, Spanish adiós). It is short for Ti raccomando a Dio (I commend you to God).
    addio - Wiktionary

    ** Etymology of arrivederci: from a (“to”) +‎ rivederci (“to see each other of us again”), from rivedersi (“see each other again, meet again”). Cognate with French au revoir.
    arrivederci - Wiktionary
     
    Last edited:

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    French does too.

    "Adieu" is used only in the case you mention, to a person you know you'll probably never see again, or for example just after someone's death.
    In other common cases - as mentioned by TheCrociato91 - we say "Au revoir" (See you later).

    Oddly enough, all Romance languages do not make the same clear distinction. Spanish, for example has only "Adiós" (but I'll leave it to a Spanish native to comment on it).
     
    Last edited:

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Spanish, for example has only "Adiós" (but I'll leave it to a Spanish native to comment on it).
    Spanish also has "hasta luego" (lit. "until later") which is probably even more common than "adiós". I once read somebody mentioning the same difference in nuance as in French or Italian but to be honest I'd use them interchangeably.

    As for Catalan, we mostly say "adéu" (often shortened to "déu"), other alternatives (including "a reveure" which is cognate to the French and Italian expressions) being clearly secondary. I don't establish any kind of difference in nuance between them.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Spanish also has "hasta luego" (lit. "until later") which is probably even more common than "adiós". I once read somebody mentioning the same difference in nuance as in French or Italian but to be honest I'd use them interchangeably.
    I'm surprised too! I understand now why I never saw again all those to whom I said "Adiós" :D
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I don't think there's a way to make the distinction in Palestinian Arabic, but in Standard Arabic you have:

    وداعًا (wadāʿan) - forever
    إلى اللقاء (ila 'l-liqāʾ) - until I see you next
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Czech distinguishes the two situations as well.

    (1) see you (later), formal:

    Na shledanou! (most common, "to meeting/reunion");
    Na viděnou! (less common, "to seeing", the meaning is similar to au revoir, arrivederci, auf Wiedersehen, but without the prefix re-/ri-/wieder-);
    Na slyšenou! (used in radio broadcasting, "to hearing");

    (2) goodbye forever:

    Sbohem! < jdi (jděte) s Bohem, translated from Latin: i (ite) cum Deo (= go with God);

    On occasion we say Sbohem a šáteček! (lit. "Goodbye and a neckerchief"), often ironically in the sense "Goodbye and don't come back!".

    After Sbohem a šáteček (English translation), a title of a poem (and a collection of poems) written by Vítězslav Nezval (1933). It used to be a set book.
     
    Last edited:

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Goodbye forever can be expressed
    So long!
    Farewell!
    Godspeed!
    Adieu!


    Perhaps So long! and Farewell! don't technically have to be forever.

    @Dymn Isn't Fins abiat like Hasta luego?

    I have noticed the Spanish expression A ver si nos vemos usually means you won't be seeing the person again. Maybe like I'll be seeing you.
     
    Last edited:

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    In Portuguese, Brazilian usage of "adeus" seems to follow French and Italian, while in Portugal it's still used casually, although many also report dramatic connotations. In both sides of the ocean "tchau" seems to be the most common choice. In Spain, "chao" is also common, especially among young women.

    @Dymn Isn't Fins abiat like Hasta luego?
    "Fins aviat" is "hasta pronto". "Hasta luego" would be "fins després", but it's not as used as it is in Spanish.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Sardinian :

    (this is used as curse against someone)


    Mai ti torres a bìdere!
    = never could you be seen again

    Mai = never
    ti torres = you could return (subjunctive present of "torrare" = to return)
    a bìdere = to see

    While the normal goodbye formula is : Adiòsu

    Other ways to say goodbye are also :

    Nos bidìmus = literally "we see us"

    A nos bìdere = literally "to see us"
    Nos intendimus = literally "we hear us"

    A nos intendere = literally "to hear us"

     
    Greek:

    «Αντίο» [anˈdi.ɔ] < It. addio. Usually means goodbye for forever. Often is accompanied with «για πάντα» [ʝa ˈpan.da] as emphasis:
    «Αντίο για πάντα» [anˈdi.ɔ ʝa ˈpan.da] --> goodbye forever.

    In other common cases we use:
    «Γεια!» [ʝa] --> hello, hi, cheers lit. (have) health < aphetism & colloquialism of Classical fem. noun «ὑγιείᾱ» hŭgĭeíā (Ionic «ὑγιείη» hŭgĭeíē, MoGr fem. «υγεία» [iˈʝi.a]) --> health (PIE *h₂iu- span of life, vital force cf Skt. आयु (āyu), lifetime, Lat. ævum + PIE *gʷih₃- to live cf Arm. կեալ (keal), to live). It's the informal and most common one.
    More formal: «Γεια σας!» [ʝa sas] --> lit. health to you (2nd p. pl. or formal).
    «Eις το επανιδείν» [is tɔ e.pa.niˈðin], a Katharevousa fossilised phraseme, calqued for the Fr. au révoir, is used formally, and it lit. means until we saw each other again; «επανιδείν» [e.pa.niˈðin] is the (fossilised) aorist infinitive «ἐπανιδεῖν» ĕpănideîn (aorist indicative «ἐπανεῖδον» ĕpaneîdŏn), of the Classical v. «ἐπανοράω/ἐπανορῶ» ĕpănŏráō (uncontracted)/ĕpănŏrô (contracted) --> to see again, re-examine.
    Informally, a simple «θα τα ξαναπούμε» [θa ta k͡sa.naˈpume] --> we'll talk again, or «τα λέμε» [ta ˈle.me] --> we (will) talk, suffices.
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks for the responses, everyone.
    So long!
    Farewell!
    Godspeed!
    Adieu!
    Can't help but be reminded of that song from The Sound of Music...the song that the kids sing before heading off to bed...(that was The Sound of Music, right?) Or that scene from Titanic, when the passengers and the people on the dock are waving goodbye to each other. But they didn't know it was going to be forever. >_>
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Which languages have a unique way to say goodbye (forever) to a person (or a thing or something more abstract) you know you'll probably never see again.
    Russian uses "прощай" (proscháy) or plural/formal "прощайте" (proscháyte) in that role - literally ~"be forgiving".
    For occasional goodbyes, on the other hand, Russian uses default "до свидания" (do svidániya) - "till the meeting"; more informal expressions are "пока" (poká) - "while" and "счастливо" (schastlívo) - "happily".
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    In Romanian

    Adio ! - Goodbye forever !

    Those who used "Adio" wanted to convey the fact that the next meeting is "ad Dio," that is in the presence of God.

    The interjection emphasized that the proximate encounter between the protagonists would be in heaven, not on the earth.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top