goody-goody

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by danalto, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. danalto

    danalto Senior Member

    Roma, Italia, Europa
    Italy - Italian
    Here we are (meaning me...) with Halloweentown, the movie about witches and warlocks and non-humans...
    Scarlett and Sapphire are two (nice) witches, who are trying to get Marnie, another (nice) witch, to do something Marnie doesn't want to...;)
    So, how could I render goody-goody here??

    SCARLETT
    Uh, yeah. Listen. That's not going to be so easy. This Marnie chick is super tough.
    SAPPHIRE
    She's just so...goody-goody.


    SCARLETT
    Uh…già…senti…temo proprio che non sarà facile! Quella Marnie è una tipa tosta!
    SAPPHIRE
    Sì, è così ???

    EDIT: forse il commento, venendo da Sapphire che è la strega "cattiva", potrebbe semplicemente significare che è un osso duro proprio perché è "una brava ragazza"?
     
  2. Murador Member

    Modena
    Italy/Italian
    I don't reall know its meaning, but I feel it means something on the lines of "virtuoso" but with an hint of irony, considering we are talking about witches.

    maybe something like "è così dannatamente buona/corretta/virtuosa" even if it's not a literal translation.
     
  3. danalto

    danalto Senior Member

    Roma, Italia, Europa
    Italy - Italian
  4. mrg Senior Member

    I saw a thread on this subject in the last couple of days, but now I can't find it! A goody-goody (it would usually be a noun) is someone who is always behaving properly, never does anything inappropriate. It can also have a little connotation of the "teacher's pet" or "brown-noser"/"kiss-ass.":warn: It often describes someone who is afraid to get into trouble, not just someone who doesn't. Non ho nessun'idea come dirlo in italiano.
     
  5. Jamila

    Jamila Senior Member

    Italian
    What about

    E' così "perfettina" ?

    or

    E' la signorina perfezione

    or

    E' miss perfezione
     
  6. TrentinaNE

    TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    No irony here. Goody-goody means excessively good and virtuous -- and therefore often dull. ;)

    Elisabetta

    P.S. Esatto come mrg ha appena scritto. :thumbsup:

    P.P.S. In the same vein, Goody two shoes.
     
  7. danalto

    danalto Senior Member

    Roma, Italia, Europa
    Italy - Italian
    I posted the link above! ;)
     
  8. cas29

    cas29 Senior Member

    Milan Italy
    Canada/English
    I found "santarellina"
     
  9. maryam87 Member

    Salerno
    Italiano
    Ciao! Mi sono sorti un pò di dubbi sul termine "goody goody" e sulle sue possibili traduzioni... Mi scuso in anticipo per la marea di domande...

    Allora, in questa frase:
    "My friends are better than yours... a bunch of goody-goodies and brown-nosers!"
    "I miei amici sono migliori dei tuoi... una massa di ipocriti e ruffiani!"
    i due termini possono essere sinonimi? Perchè trovandomi a cercare i loro significati ho notato che bene o male non c'era tanta differenza...

    In base ai vari esempi che ho trovato ho associato le seguenti traduzioni ai due termini, vanno tutte bene?
    Goody-goody: buono, bigotto, moralista, bacchettona
    Brown-nosers: ruffiano, leccaculo, lecchino, adulatore

    Il termine "santarellina" va bene per goody-goody o è tradotto meglio da goody two-shoes?

    Poi, qui per "goody-goody" nel contesto scolastico: "Goody-goodies usually sit in the front row and smile at teachers during class"... s'intende qualcosa come "i saputelli", "i so tutto io", "i primi della classe"? quindi come sinonimo di wise guy?

    Infine, mi domandavo, il termine goody-goody ha solo accezzione negativa? O va bene anche per parlare di una persona che è "buona di cuore", senza ironia insomma?
    Mi è venuto il dubbio analizzando questa frase...

    "Samantha is a real goody-goody. She always offers to erase the blackboard at the end of class"
    quest'espressione qui si può tradurre con "Samantha è veramente una brava ragazza...."

    Grazie in anticipo :)
     
  10. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Banned

    Italy, Italiano
    "baciapile" o, volgarmente :warning:"leccaculo"
    ( anche boriosa / superba ma nella tua frase mi sembra più adatto baciapile)
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
  11. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Secondo me "baciapile" ha connotazione più religiosa che generica (deriva dall'unione di baciare + pile = acquasantiere).
     
  12. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Banned

    Italy, Italiano
    Può darsi tu abbia ragione, "baciapile" è un termine che non uso mai…Dato che uso sempre quello volgare, del quale lì per lì non mi veniva una versione ortodossa. Mi è venuto in mente "baciapile" e controllando sul Dizionario mi pareva potesse adeguato.
     
  13. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    Hi maryam,

    I'll try to sort some of these out without getting too confused!

    Goody-goody is always derogatory, so never "una brava ragazza" (without irony). However, a goody-goody in a classroom context is slightly different from an "io so tutto," who in English is a know-it-all. A know-it-all might also be a goody-goody, but the two don't have to overlap: a know-it-all might interrupt or even contradict the teacher in order to show off his/her knowledge, whereas the goody-goody would be the kid who turns to look disapprovingly at the know-it-all and then smiles at the teacher to show that he/she sympathizes with the teacher's frustration.

    Actually, that kind of behaviour (smiling at the teacher to show sympathy when another kid misbehaves) is more likely to be called brown-nosing.
    A brown-noser is most definitely a "leccaculo," which is why his nose is brown.:D In a classroom context, a goody-goody is usually just an insulting term for a kid who does his/her work conscientiously and never does anything to get in trouble. Out of the classroom and in the adult world, the word has wider applications, as implied by the translations "bigotto, moralista, bacchettona" that you found.

    A wise guy (assuming we're not talking about gangsters) is entirely different from either. In a classroom, the wise guy would be the one cracking jokes to make the other kids laugh, and making insolent remarks to the teacher. But I haven't heard the term used in this context for some time, and personally would be more likely to call this person a "wise-ass":warn:.

    A goody-two-shoes is exactly the same as a goody-goody. One might be more BE and the other more AE, but I'm not sure which is which.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
  14. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'd be careful about putting too much negativity in the translation of "goody-goody." I think "perfettina" or "santarellina" are closer (though I don't see why it has to be femmine) than "bigotto" or "moralista". It's basically a mildly critical description of someone who behaves so well he/she is often considered dull and "too perfect" by those less "perfect" (who lose in comparison). But a "goody-goody" isn't necessarily "boriosa" or "superba", nor a "leccaculo" (which is far too vulgar).
     
  15. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I agree with you. :)
     
  16. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    While my Italian's not up to weighing in on the difference in nuance between "santarellina" and "moralista," I still think that the specific implications of "goody-goody" depend on the context. Among children and adolescents (if children and adolescents use the term any more?) Curiosone's description fits the bill: "It's basically a mildly critical description of someone who behaves so well he/she is often considered dull and "too perfect" by those less "perfect" (who lose in comparison)." Or, as I said above, "In a classroom context, a goody-goody is usually just an insulting term for a kid who does his/her work conscientiously and never does anything to get in trouble."

    Maybe I move in the wrong circles, but I can't imagine an adult calling another adult a "goody-goody" without some suggestion that this person is not only "too perfect" but also sanctimonious and holier-than-thou. The OED also has a nice definition: a person "addicted to or characterized by inept manifestations of good or pious sentiment." And Merriam-Webster defines it as someone "affectedly or ingratiatingly good or proper."
     
  17. maryam87 Member

    Salerno
    Italiano
    Thank you!!! :)


    So taking your both explanations into account can i ultimately say that a goody-goody is a "finta/o santarellina/o", "finto buono" and so translating it just with "persona falsa"? Basically, if i got it now, a goody-goody is a person who pretends to be what he/she is actually not, so a "persona finta/falsa"? Someone who doesn't practice what he/she preaches?
     
  18. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    I don't think so. A goody-goody doesn't have to be a hypocrite. He/she can be just as perfect as he/she seems--except for the possibility, as I explain in post #16, that he/she looks down on others for not being equally perfect.

    Do you have a specific sentence and context to be translated? If it's the one in post #9 beginning "my friends are better than yours...", what is the context? Who is speaking to whom?
     
  19. maryam87 Member

    Salerno
    Italiano
    Uhm ok, so i think "perfettina" would fit... Maybe "snob" would work too?

    As for the sentence i used,
    - "My friends are better than yours... a bunch of goody-goodies and brown-nosers!"- I translated goody-goodies as "ipocriti". It's better "perfettini" then?Anyway the sentence is part of a dialogue with idiomatic expression... This is the link http://books.google.it/books?id=isE... english like an american goody-goody&f=false . The expression in particular is used on page 58, then there is its explanation on page 60. Here you can find the other two sentences i was trying to translate:
    - "Goody-goodies usually sit in the front row and smile at teachers during class"
    - "Samantha is a real goody-goody. She always offers to erase the blackboard at the end of class"

    In these two sentences goody-goody can be a synonim of brown-nosers? because i don't think "perfettino/a" would work...

    Santarellino/a has more to do with an innocent, pious person, with no pity, like an angel (there is irony in it); while moralista is just moralist, puritan, someone who has very strong opinions about what is right and what is wrong.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 2, 2014
  20. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Then I think "santarellino/a" is better than your other choices. The difference (between "goody-goody" and "santarellino/a") is that there are no religious or "pious" connotations in the English word, but I think it's as close as you can come. Your context indicates a school situation (which is what theartichoke and I both suggested was the more likely). As you mentioned, there is irony in it, which is appropriate. "Ippocrito" is not appropriate; it's too strong and too derogatory.

    Personally I find the term rather archaic, and would be surprised if kids used this term anymore. "Teacher's pet" is more common.
     
  21. maryam87 Member

    Salerno
    Italiano
    Ok, than you, then santarellino/a it is! :)
     
  22. Willower

    Willower Senior Member

    South Wales
    English (British)
    Although the phrase is used in relation to school here, the Urban Dictionary shows the word used primarily in in the context of (abstinence from!)the teenage culture of "sex, drugs and rock'n'roll" http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=goody goody&utm_source=search-action - I guess it's a phrase that adolescents still use. As others have said, it's rarely used about adults - though I can imagine it being said in a jokey way - for example to a friend who never eats anything fattening! I liked the original translation "virtuoso" - that lacks any religious connotations.
     
  23. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks for your input, Willower! :) Now that you mention it, I can imagine it said in a jokey way, in the sort of context you suggested.
    So while I still "santarellina" works in the "schoolgirl" context, I like "virtuoso/a" would work better in a more adult context.
     

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