google

  • LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I am not sure, but I think it is /gûgul/.

    "Goo" as in "good"
    "gle" as in "eagle"

    In Spanish, it would be /gugel/.

    I hope this helps.
     

    jbottle

    Member
    england/english
    A google i have no idea but you mite b interested to now that a "googol" is a huge number, equal two ten "duotrigintillion" and is written like this

    10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000
     

    jbottle

    Member
    england/english
    If you added all the particles in the known universe, there would not be a googol particles. A "googleplex" is even larger! It is written as 1 and then a google zeros. There are so many digits that if all the particles in the unioverse were converted to paper or ink, you still would nevre finish writing it!!!!!!!!!!!

    Thinking of this another way, consider printing the digits of a googolplex in unreadable, 1-point font. Tex 1pt font is .3514598mm per digit, which means it would take about 3.5 * 1096 meters to write in one point font. The known universe is estimated at 7.4 * 1026 meters in diameter, which means the distance to write the digits would be about 4.7 * 1069 times the diameter of the known universe
     

    Markus

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    LadyBlakeney said:
    I am not sure, but I think it is /gûgul/.

    "Goo" as in "good"
    "gle" as in "eagle"

    In Spanish, it would be /gugel/.

    I hope this helps.

    Small correction, though it might be due to accents. I pronounce the "goo" in google as in the oo in "too", not the oo in "good".
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Okay, I would like to add the IPA pronunciation equivalents for everybody's convenience.

    I agree with Markus.

    The correct pronunciation of google is [gugәl] or [gugl] <-- with a diacritic under the "l" to indicate "syllabic l"

    The IPA transcription of /gûgul/ is [gυgul] <- note the special first "u" - and that isn't correct, IMHO.

    ~Lainyn

    PS: You need to be viewing this web page in Unicode characters in order to see the IPA symbols.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey All;

    I agree with Markus..
    I have always said it as
    'goo'...like 'eewww I just steped in some goo'...
    'gle'...like the begining of 'glad'...
    (the 'e' is just to make the letters even..so that it looks good):D

    te gato;)
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Associated Topics || Dr. Math Home || Search Dr. Math


    Googol, Kasner, and Milton Sirotta

    Date: 07/14/99 at 16:55:09
    From: Melanie
    Subject: Powers of 10

    Who coined the phrase "googleplex," and when? I have used several
    search engines and they have the definition, but not the origin.

    Thank you for your consideration,
    Melanie


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Date: 07/15/99 at 11:59:13
    From: Doctor Peterson
    Subject: Re: Powers of 10

    Hi, Melanie.

    We get questions about this frequently, so I did a little extra
    research to find the details beyond what's in our archives.

    Here's a page on the Web that tells about the origin of the words
    googol and googolplex:

    How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement
    http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictG.html

    This says:

    "googol

    a unit of quantity equal to 10^100 (1 followed by 100 zeroes). The
    googol was invented by the American mathematician Edward Kasner (1878-
    1955) in 1938. According to the story, Kasner asked his nephew Milton
    Sirotta, who was then 8 years old, what name he would give to a really
    large number, and "googol" was Milton's response. Kasner also defined
    the googolplex, equal to 10^googol, that is, 1 followed by a googol of
    zeroes. These inventions caught the public's fancy and are often
    mentioned in discussions of very large numbers."

    A slightly different version is in

    Googolplex
    http://www.fpx.de/fp/Fun/Googolplex/

    which says:

    "The American mathematician Edward Kasner once asked his nine-year-old
    nephew to invent a name for a very large number, ten to the power of
    one hundred; and the boy called it a googol. He thought this was a
    number to overflow people's minds, being bigger than anything that can
    ever be put into words. Another mathematician then shot back with
    googolplex, and defined it to be 10 to the power of googol."

    Here's a review of the 1940 book in which Kasner discussed the googol:

    Edward Kasner and James Newman. Mathematics and the Imagination
    http://www-users.cs.york.ac.uk/~susan/bib/nf/k/kasner.htm

    Also check out our Dr. Math FAQ on large numbers:

    http://mathforum.org/dr.math/faq/faq.large.numbers.html

    Summing up, the googol was named by Milton Sirotta, and the googolplex
    by his uncle Edward Kasner, who I suspect had set Milton up by asking
    for a name for the googol, just so he could name something incredibly
    larger.

    Incidentally, you'll find that the googol can just as well be called
    "10 duotrigintillion" following the (more or less) standard
    conventions for naming large numbers; googol is just the fun name,
    which allows us to name "googolplex" easily; and if a mathematician
    or scientist ever had occasion to use either number, they would just
    call them 10^100 and 10^10^100 because numbers are much easier to work
    with than names.

    - Doctor Peterson, The Math Forum
    http://mathforum.org/dr.math/
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Question: there is another word, goggle, to stare at people.

    But I think I've heard people pronounce this word like "google". Could this be a local variation in pronunciation.

    How about, "all google-eyed". I could SWEAR I've heard these. Any one else?

    Wait, I just used Google to find it:

    "There are google-eyed aliens attacking us from Mars!"

    Gaer
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    gaer said:
    Question: there is another word, goggle, to stare at people.

    But I think I've heard people pronounce this word like "google". Could this be a local variation in pronunciation.

    How about, "all google-eyed". I could SWEAR I've heard these. Any one else?

    Wait, I just used Google to find it:

    "There are google-eyed aliens attacking us from Mars!"

    Gaer
    Hey gaer;
    Yes..you can also say google-eyed..(but it is with a long 'e')..like in tree..

    te gato;)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    te gato said:
    Hey gaer;
    Yes..you can also say google-eyed..(but it is with a long 'e')..like in tree..

    te gato;)
    Really? You may be right. I can't remember! (And it does not appear to be in most dictionaries. So is it slang?

    Gaer
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    gaer said:
    I think you're right. "Spelt"? Interesting, just a touch of BE in your writing style. Did you know it? :)

    Gaer
    gaer;
    BS..yes..BE..noooooo
    aggggg..to many debates with benji me thinks..:D

    te gato;)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    te gato said:
    gaer;
    BS..yes..BE..noooooo
    aggggg..to many debates with benji me thinks..:D

    te gato;)
    So you don't say "lernt"?

    I don't say any of the BE forms of verbs, but I heard them my whole life from my family (father and his family), and I think they sound beautiful.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Gaer said:
    "Question: there is another word, goggle, to stare at people."

    I have never heard that, but ogle--I have heard ogle.

    ogle Averb1 ogle
    look at with amorous intentions Category Tree: lookogle
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    gaer said:
    How about, "all google-eyed". I could SWEAR I've heard these. Any one else?
    I'm old enough to remember John D Loudermilk's song "Google Eye". I don't know how much it has to do with the above phrase, but it shows that the word existed at least as far back as 1962.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    gaer said:
    So you don't say "lernt"?

    I don't say any of the BE forms of verbs, but I heard them my whole life from my family (father and his family), and I think they sound beautiful.
    Hey gaer;
    I was kidding..
    I do say 'lernt'..and..'spelt'..as to why??
    I have not the foggiest idea...
    Such a conundrum..me thinks..:D

    te gato;)
     

    Erzebeth

    New Member
    Español - Chile
    in spanish we pronounce it "gugle" or "gugul" at least here in chile, and the last one is the commonest
     

    clavicordo

    Member
    italian
    Thank you for "spanish" pronounciation of "google".
    Anyway I would like to know how English and American people pronounce this word.
    moz-screenshot.jpg
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Clavicordo, I cannot see the image file you've attempted to post. If it is a new word you'd like to discuss, please start a new thread for your question, and include that word in the thread title.
    Thank you.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Many here might remember the comic strip "Snuffy Smith." Well, in its original form it was called Barney Google. Barney was a racetrack layabout, self-styled man about town-- and something of a whimsical know-it-all, which to me implies some connection to the name choice for the search engine. He was the city-cousin foil for Snuffy Smith, whose earthy "smarts" always trumped Barney Googles big-city truisms. Snuffy was a much more interesting character, at least to city readers, and he took over the strip.

    A character not unlike Barney Google is more familiar too you all, I imagine-- Cliff Claven of the Cheers sitcom.
    .
     

    clavicordo

    Member
    italian
    Kelly B said:
    Clavicordo, I cannot see the image file you've attempted to post. If it is a new word you'd like to discuss, please start a new thread for your question, and include that word in the thread title.
    Thank you.
    Hi, actually I didn't try to post any image file, I simply asked what is the most used pronounciation by English and American people of the word "Google".
    Thank you
     
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