Gospel Dance Song/ Christian Gospel Dance Song

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Sara Lee

Senior Member
Chinese
I came across a term, "Gospel Dance Song"/ "Christian Gospel Dance Song"
I'm not really sure about its meaning, and what it actually refers to.

Here are some source links:
Dance music - Wikipedia

"christian gospel dance song" - Google Search

“Gospel Dance Song” - Google Search

♫ I Carry My Cross (I Surrender) - Kim Williams. Listen @cdbaby


I found "Gospel Dance Song"/"Christian Gospel Dance Song" is widely used on Google, but I'm not sure whether it is a correct and natural expression, whether it's understandable and proper to use.
I found that on many of these websites, there are many song videos produced by African singers/people, or many are related with kind of African dance songs. It seems that Gospel Dance Song has some connection to a special kind of African songs? I'm really not sure about this.

These links basically say that, dance song may refer to:
  • A danceable song; see dance music
  • A song concerning itself almost entirely with a particular dance; in most cases most or all of the song lyric is given over to instructions for the associated dance, for example:
  • "Hokey cokey" (known as "Hokey pokey" in the United States, Canada, Ireland, Australia, the Caribbean and Mexico)

Q1. What's the meaning of "Gospel Dance Song" or "Christian Gospel Dance Song"? Are they the same thing? Do these 2 terms make sense?
In you natives' eyes, does it refer to a Christian gospel song which is dancable or to which people/Christians can dance, or does it refer to any special kind of songs?

Q2. For a lively Christian song, to which Christians dance to praise and worship God.
Is it fine or okay to call this Christian song as a "Gospel Dance Song", or a "Christian Gospel Dance Song"?

:) :)
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would assume it meant Christian gospel music suitable to dance to. Some of that music is set to lyrics and would be a "Christian gospel song".
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi, Packard
    Thank you so much for your answer.

    So, in your eyes, do "Gospel Dance Song" and "Christian Gospel Dance Song" make sense?
    Or do you have any other opinions?
    :) :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Hi, Packard
    Thank you so much for your answer.

    So, in your eyes, do "Gospel Dance Song" and "Christian Gospel Dance Song" make sense?
    Or do you have any other opinions?
    :) :)
    Yes they make sense to me. I don't know the convention within the Christian music arena as to the terminology and you should do more research to see if these are typical phrases in that community.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Okay, I see.
    Thanks a lot for sharing your ideas and for your sincere help, Packard
    One further question:
    If you have to choose between "Gospel Dance Song" and "Christian Gospel Dance Song," which one makes more sense to you?
    😄
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Okay, I see.
    Thanks a lot for sharing your ideas and for your sincere help, Packard
    One further question:
    If you have to choose between "Gospel Dance Song" and "Christian Gospel Dance Song," which one makes more sense to you?
    😄
    In the USA I think "Gospel music" is synonymous with "Christian music". I don't know if they use the phrase "Christian gospel music" however.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In the USA I think "Gospel music" is synonymous with "Christian music". I don't know if they use the phrase "Christian gospel music" however.
    Gospel music is a sub-category of Christian music. There is no Gospel music that is not Christian so "Christian gospel" would be unusual.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Okay, I see.
    Thanks a lot for sharing your ideas and for your helpful answer.

    So, do "Gospel Dance Song" and "Christian Dance Song" make sense to you?
    How do you understand them?
    I mean these two terms above, not gospel music or Christian music.
    :) :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Songs are music with words. Neither Gospel nor Christian are forms of dancing, but they are categories of music. We can't remove music from the equation. :)
    You seem to be talking about a song in the Gospel music or Christian music genre that is appropriate for dancing or a video showing someone dancing along with such a song.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You seem to be talking about a song in the Gospel music or Christian music genre that is appropriate for dancing or a video showing someone dancing along with such a song.
    Yeah, you are definitely right.
    That's what I meant and refer to.
    I refer to a gospel song/ Christian song that is appropriate for dancing or a video showing someone dancing along with such a song.

    If in a video, a group of people dance joyfully to/along with a gospel song.
    Is it acceptable or fine to call this gospel song as a "Gospel Dance Song"?

    :)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    To recap, Christian music includes a whole range of music, ranging from Greek orthodox liturgical music to Bach's Mass in B Minor to the Protestant hymns of Isaac Watts to gospel music. The WR dictionary defines gospel music as "a now popularized form of impassioned rhythmic spiritual music rooted in the solo and responsive church singing of rural blacks in the American South, central to the development of rhythm and blues and of soul music."
    There are Christian songs that are not gospel music but are appropriate for dancing (slow movements of course!): At the Cross by Isaac Watts (1707) is something one could dance to.
    If I were putting some gospel music oline and I wanted people to know that their feet will get to moving as they listen, I'd call it "Gospel Music you Can Dance To."
    Contrary to Packard, I don't think gospel music is synonymous with Christian music. The hymns sung in a Lutheran or Episcopalian church on Sunday morning are not necessarily gospel, but they are definitely Christian.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi, there, Roxxxannne
    Thank you for your answer and explanations.


    Then focus on and go back to my question on #11 floor.

    I refer to a gospel song/ Christian song that is appropriate for dancing or a video showing someone dancing along with such a song.
    If in a video, a group of people dance joyfully to/along with a gospel song.
    Is it acceptable or fine to call this gospel song as a "Gospel Dance Song" or a "Christian Dance Song" ?

    :)

    What do you think about it? What's your opinion?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Contrary to Packard, I don't think gospel music is synonymous with Christian music.
    Neither do I, but I suspect that what he really meant was that all gospel music is Christian music, but that not all Christian music is necessarily also gospel music.
    If in a video, a group of people dance joyfully to/along with a gospel song.
    Is it acceptable or fine to call this gospel song as a "Gospel Dance Song"?
    Not necessarily. I would only call something a gospel dance song if it had been especially designed to be danced to. In principle, one could dance to a song that has not been written with dancing in mind.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would only call something a gospel dance song if it had been especially designed to be danced to.
    Thank you so much for your answer, Edinburgher.
    Yes, this gospel song is specially designed to be danced to, and is very appropriate for dancing,

    So is it fine or acceptable to call it a "Gospel Dance Song"?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    If I saw the phrase "gospel dance song" I'd think it's a song written specifically to be danced to. So, since that's what it is, it seems perfectly fine to call it a gospel dance song.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think we might be talking about two (at least) meanings of 'gospel' here. There is the genre of gospel music/singing as defined in Roxxxanne's post #12, with which many of us are familiar with, and then there are songs of praise (or hymns) that refer to the Christian teachings or the Christian gospel.

    I may be wrong, but I suspect that Sara Lee is talking about the latter. And I suspect that these are musically closer to folk or pop than gospel.

    Unless the songs are stylistically in the recognised style of the gospel genre, I think it's best not to describe them as gospel songs.

    Most pop songs are designed to be danced to, but we would never describe them as 'pop dance songs'. I think the same goes for 'gospel songs'.

    In short, I don't think 'Gospel dance song' works as a description for a religious song you can dance to.

    Having said all that, I can't think of a good simple short term for them.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I think we might be talking about two (at least) meanings of 'gospel' here. There is the genre of gospel music/singing as defined in Roxxxanne's post #12, with which many of us are familiar with, and then there are songs of praise (or hymns) that refer to the Christian teachings or the Christian gospel.

    I may be wrong, but I suspect that Sara Lee is talking about the latter. And I suspect that these are musically closer to folk or pop than gospel.

    Unless the songs are stylistically in the recognised style of the gospel genre, I think it's best not to describe them as gospel songs.

    Most pop songs are designed to be danced to, but we would never describe them as 'pop dance songs'. I think the same goes for 'gospel songs'.

    In short, I don't think 'Gospel dance song' works as a description for a religious song you can dance to.

    Having said all that, I can't think of a good simple short term for them.
    While I was referring earlier to several specific subgenres of music (#12), I think almost any song these days that praises God in the Christian faith tradition (and that's not sung in the style of an Isaac Watts-type hymn ) can be called 'gospel.' But there's a lot of cross-over, as one would expect. For instance, "Were You There When They Crucified My Lord" is one of the most popular gospel songs, and it has been sung by Johnny Cash and the Carter Family, Willie Nelson, the King's College Cambridge choir, and in a re-working by the late great Sam Cooke and the Soul Stirrers. The song itself was probably composed by African-American slaves, or maybe their children, but the King's College version is probably thousand miles away from that original version.
    I could go on for hours but I won't.
     

    Sara Lee

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Having said all that, I can't think of a good simple short term for them.
    Thank you for your help and answer, heypresto



    While I was referring earlier to several specific subgenres of music (#12), I think almost any song these days that praises God in the Christian faith tradition (and that's not sung in the style of an Isaac Watts-type hymn ) can be called 'gospel.' But there's a lot of cross-over, as one would expect. For instance, "Were You There When They Crucified My Lord" is one of the most popular gospel songs, and it has been sung by Johnny Cash and the Carter Family, Willie Nelson, the King's College Cambridge choir, and in a re-working by the late great Sam Cooke and the Soul Stirrers. The song itself was probably composed by African-American slaves, or maybe their children, but the King's College version is probably thousand miles away from that original version.
    I could go on for hours but I won't.

    Okay, got it.
    Thank you for sharing this with me.
    Thanks a lot for your further and detailed explanation and for your patient help, Roxxxannne


    .
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Thank you for your help and answer, heypresto






    Okay, got it.
    Thank you for sharing this with me.
    Thanks a lot for your further and detailed explanation and for your patient help, Roxxxannne


    .
    One more thing -- this has been at the back of my brain over the last hour, thinking about heypresto's comment #17. "pop gospel" is a type of gospel music, so if you are talking about pop music with evangelizing Christian lyrics, then 'gospel dance song" sort of makes sense. But now that I think of it, you should look on the internet and see what pop-gospel singers call the songs they sing, and use whatever terminology they use.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    you should look on the internet and see what pop-gospel singers call the songs they sing, and use whatever terminology they use.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: I agree. I think this is very sound advice.

    We've all given this a lot of thought, and come to various conclusions, but for my part at least, it can only be a guess. I'll happily listen to, and enjoy, gospel songs sung by gospel choirs, and by the likes of Johnny Cash and Willy Nelson, but I'm not a Christian, and not part of the intended audience for evangelising pop. I certainly wouldn't dance to it either.:)
     
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