Gospel of Jesus Christ

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Margaret Moore

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi everyone,
I need to decide a section name on a website, could you tell me which one is natural?
I want to use "The Gospel of Jesus Christ," but the spacing is not enough for so many words as in "The Gospel of Jesus Christ", so I have to choose a short one. I wonder whether "Gospel of Jesus Christ" is fine since I omitted "the". I remembered that when writing something related to the gospel of Jesus Christ, we should not omit "the", it is specific. I'm not sure whether I can omit "the" as it is a name for a section.

The Gospel of Jesus
The Gospel of Christ
Gospel of Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ's Gospel
 
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  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    What is your intended meaning? Do you mean the 'good news' of Jesus Christ having come to save humanity? The usual phrase is 'the Gospel of Jesus Christ', as you said, but as a section title, you can probably get away with omitting the article. In headlines, articles tend to get dropped for the same reason.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Like you, I prefer The Gospel of Jesus Christ, but, if spacing is a problem, then I would vote for The Gospel of Christ. I say that because Jesus is his given name, and was just an ordinary Jewish name, where as Christ, meaning the anointed one or messiah, is his heavenly title. Christ is unmistakably recognizable as the Savior and Redeemer of the world.
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There is no such thing as the "Gospel of Jesus Christ" in either the canonical or non-canonical writings.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    There is no such thing as the "Gospel of Jesus Christ" in either the canonical or non-canonical writings.
    That is why I asked the question at the start. MM wasn't using 'Gospel' there to mean the account of the life of Jesus (as in John's Gospel or the Gospel of Matthew). As she said, the is the gospel or good news of the kingdom of heaven, centred around Jesus Christ.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    There is no such thing as the "Gospel of Jesus Christ" in either the canonical or non-canonical writings.
    Surely you are not speaking for every Christian church on the earth. Many, many churches teach the Gospel of Jesus Christ. True, the four gospels were written by Matthew Mark, Luke and John, but they each preach and teach of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. This is a very common terminology in Christian churches.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Ripper, that's not how I understand the term. I understand it to mean the good news of God having provided the means of salvation through Jesus Christ. As Peter Jensen, a former Australian Anglican bishop puts it, 'God has revealed himself definitively in the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ’ (The Revelation of God, p 12).
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Ripper, that's not how I understand the term. I understand it to mean the good news of God having provided the means of salvation through Jesus Christ. As Peter Jensen, a former Australian Anglican bishop puts it, 'God has revealed himself definitively in the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ’ (The Revelation of God, p 12).
    Nat, there are four main meanings of the word ‘gospel’, and this is the one that I understand it to mean here:

    a. the gospel or the Gospel
    the things that Jesus said and taught, according to the Bible
    Jesus told his disciples to go and preach the gospel.

    The others are in the dictionary here:

    gospel (noun) definition and synonyms | Macmillan Dictionary
     
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    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    The first time I ever ran into the phrase, I interpreted it as just a long way of saying "gospel", because of course all gospels are about Jesus.

    Eventually I figured out that it didn't mean just any gospel, but was filling in the name "Jesus Christ" in the form "the Gospel of ___", where the blank spot is normally filled in with the alleged author's name. (The fact that there is no such known book does not change the fact that the idea of such a book is a known idea which people sometimes talk about by that name, even if just hypothetically or rhetorically or in fiction.)

    Now that I am aware that both meanings exist for that phrase, I would simply never use that phrase. Both meanings can be written in other ways with no ambiguity.
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is a genuine question. Why not simply say 'The Christian Gospel'? There are no other gospels as far as I know.
    ('Gospel' means 'good news'.)
     
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