got a phonecall

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ticcota

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi,

After I finished a call, I said "I got a phonecall." (I used this sentence to mean "I had a phonecall."). But my friend (American) said "Oh, take your time." so I figured he understood this as "I have a call now.". So my questions are:

1. Is "I got a phonecall." commonly understood as "I've got a phonecall." in American English? (I was told "got" is informal way of "have got" for this context, but I'm not sure if that is true.)

2. If to mean "I had a phonecall." - past tense, is "had" the only word I can choose, and can I use any tense of "get" to expression the same idea?

Thank you.
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree that I would first understand it as "I received a phone call". It could as you say also mean "I have a phone call" in which case I would say "have" or "have got". To make the "receive" meaning clear you'd say simply "someone called me".
     
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    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I'm not familiar with "phonecall" nor with "telephonecall." It's a two-word compound.

    I don't think I would say "I got a phone call" at the moment I was receiving a telephone call. I would say, "I got a phone call yesterday—some jerk was trying to sell me life insurance." I might understand "I got a phone call" as meaning "I have a phone call" under certain circumstances—such as a ringing telephone in the background.
     

    idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In everyday speech Americans often (and somewhat sloppily) use "I got," "I've got" and "I have" interchangeably. But I would almost never use "I got" to mean "I received," without some indication of time: "I got a phone call yesterday," or "I just got a phone call." If I heard someone say "I got a phone call," I would understand them to mean they were on the phone at that moment.
     
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