got cut freshman year

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  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree with James.

    Typically, in an American high school, let's say for basketball, there is a freshman, JV (junior varsity), and a varsity team/squad.

    Let's say 20 freshmen want to play basketball, but the school only allows 15 people on the team. There will be try-outs, and 5 of the people will "get cut" or be eliminated from the team, as James says.

    From the freshman trying out, the coach may decide to take a freshman and put them on the varsity team (if the person is very talented).

    So the speaker in your context was eliminated, but her friend made it in the varsity team.
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Typically, in an American high school, let's say for basketball, there is a freshman, JV (junior varsity), and a varsity team/squad.

    Let's say 20 freshmen want to play basketball, but the school only allows 15 people on the team. There will be try-outs, and 5 of the people will "get cut" or be eliminated from the team, as James says.

    From the freshman trying out, the coach may decide to take a freshman and put them on the varsity team (if the person is very talented).

    So the speaker in your context was eliminated, but her friend made it in the varsity team.
    For the most part this is a very good explanation, perpend. :thumbsup:

    As someone who played high school basketball here in California and was fortunate enough to make "the cut" for every team I tried out for, I just wanted to add that those who also tried out for the team, but were "cut," were never actually considered to be "on the team." At my high school, anyone who wanted to try out for the basketball team was allowed to, but there were a series of "cuts" that took place until the coaching staff made their "final cuts" and decided who would be on the final rosters of the JV (junior varsity) and varsity squads. A player wasn't officially "on the team" until after they had managed to survive the "final cut."
     
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    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Typically, in an American high school, let's say for basketball, there is a freshman, JV (junior varsity), and a varsity team/squad.
    I just thought I'd add that in the city that I grew up in, junior high school was for students in grades 7 - 9 and "senior" high school was for students in grades 10 - 12.

    The varsity basketball coach at my high school had a personal policy of only considering juniors and seniors for the varsity team. As a sophomore you could make either the junior varsity team or the sophomore team. During my first year in high school, if I had "only" made the sophomore team and not the junior varsity team, it would have felt to me like I had been "cut."
     
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