Got the R.Es

mariana79

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello
In Eugene O'neill's play named Bread and Butter, there is a character, John, who has taken into drinking alcohol, but wants to give up. His friend, Ted, offers him a glass. John refuses saying he wants to cut it out. Ted asks him:Got the R.E.s?
Does R.E here mean religious education? got the religious education? He means: have you become religious this morning?

JOHN—No, I'm going to cut it out.
TED—(from inside) Got the R.E.s?
JOHN—(fidgeting nervously) Oh, I guess I will have one after all. There's no use playing the Spartan.
 
  • Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have no idea what it is supposed to mean.
    Are you sure it is written "R.E.s"?
    I doubt it could mean "religious education." For one thing, there would be no need for the plural s.
    Can you tell us more about what is going on in the play at that time?
    Can you provide a link to the text of the play?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I had a look at the text. It says 'R.E.s'. There is no reference to it before or after or anything which explains what it might mean: I was unable to understand it even in context.:oops:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I suspect that whatever "R.E.s" are, they are much the same as "D.Ts" - delirium tremens - a deeply unpleasant state in which the alcoholic suffers withdrawal symptoms that can bring on hallucinations and death: Delirium tremens - Wikipedia
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I suspect that whatever "R.E.s" are, they are much the same as "D.Ts" - delirium tremens - a deeply unpleasant state in which the alcoholic suffers withdrawal symptoms that can bring on hallucinations and death: Delirium tremens - Wikipedia
    Yes, I was thinking the same.

    Pink elephants are closely associated with DTs.
    Seeing pink elephants - Wikipedia

    Perhaps he was referring to red ones.:)

    From the above Wikipedia page: Beginning in about 1889, and throughout the 1890s, writers made increasingly elaborate modifications to the standard "snakes" idiom. They changed the animal to rats, monkeys, giraffes, hippopotamuses or elephants – or combinations thereof; and added color – blue, red, green, pink – and many combinations thereof.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top