GPA in British English

DearPrudence

Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
IdF
French (lower Normandy)
Hello

I think that GPA is used in American English but I wonder if there were an equivalent in British English or not at all.
That's a forer@ saying:
I'm dropping it [French class] after this year cause it's killing my GPA
that made me think of that.

Thank you :)
 
  • anwal

    Member
    English
    Dear Prudence

    I had no idea what GPA stood for and had to look it up - grade point average. As it is many years since I went to school, I cannot tell you if it is use at present. I have certainly never heard of it.

    Anwal
     

    sarcie

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I think, but am open to correction (as always! ;)) that in the US, your GPA is one of the factors considered when you apply to college. This is a reason to drop a class that you are performing badly in - if it brings down your average mark (grade), then you can drop it to bring up that average.

    In the UK, colleges don't calculate an average mark when considering your application - they ask you for specific grades in specific subjects, often related to the course you are applying for.

    Different system, different terminology I suppose - although I'd imagine that the influx of US sitcoms over the years means that GPA is a recognized term among many British people.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Thanks, especially to Sarcie :)
    That's a bit what I suspected. We have that in French but I think it's always awful to translate into British English because they simply don't have the same system.
    Now I wonder if a GPA can be calculated with grades like A - B+, ... or if it's with percentages ..?
    "I have a GPA of 70%/of B+" ?! :confused:
     

    languageGuy

    Senior Member
    USA and English
    A GPA is a weighted claculation using A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1 and F=0. You multiply the grade you received times the number of credits of the course. (An A in a 4 credit course counts more than an A in a 1 credit course.) Then add all the totals and divide by the total credits.

    You would say, "My GPA is 3.8" or simply, "I have a 4.0"
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks, especially to Sarcie :)
    That's a bit what I suspected. We have that in French but I think it's always awful to translate into British English because they simply don't have the same system.
    Now I wonder if a GPA can be calculated with grades like A - B+, ... or if it's with percentages ..?
    "I have a GPA of 70%/of B+" ?! :confused:
    It's difficult to translate because many British schools and schoolteachers like to let the pupils make mistakes without the disasters being recorded in some statistic which may do them down for years to come. You've run right into quite a deep cultural difference.

    When I worked in a French school I was astonished to find that essays were always marked out of 20, at least so I was led to believe. At my English school, essays were marked out of whatever seemed right to the teacher. I remember being pleased to receive 200 out of 200 for a piece of work, only to find that the top mark in the class was 800 out of 200. I was down at the bottom. We had a teacher who liked to be encouraging.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    A GPA is a weighted claculation using A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1 and F=0. You multiply the grade you received times the number of credits of the course. (An A in a 4 credit course counts more than an A in a 1 credit course.) Then add all the totals and divide by the total credits.

    You would say, "My GPA is 3.8" or simply, "I have a 4.0"
    Thank you languageGuy, most helpful :thumbsup:
    In French, we call that "coefficient", it can be 9 for a very important subject & 2 for things like PE :D

    When I worked in a French school I was astonished to find that essays were always marked out of 20, at least so I was led to believe. At my English school, essays were marked out of whatever seemed right to the teacher. I remember being pleased to receive 200 out of 200 for a piece of work, only to find that the top mark in the class was 800 out of 200. I was down at the bottom. We had a teacher who liked to be encouraging.
    He he, amazing! :eek:
    When we get a 16 out of 20 in high school it's already a feat! (at my time at least).
    And let's not mention courseworks ... (but that's another story)
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    I would think GPA is near "marks" in BE. It always amuses me to hear a BBC reporter speaking of a student's "high marks".

    In the US as languageguy mentioned A, B, C, etc are given a numerical equivalent. Grading systems may vary from school to school.

    ex. I went to a high school where you had to earn a 94 to receive an A. Most schools use 90. (This is a grading system using 100 as a perfect A+). I then moved to another State where the GPA was based on the 3.0, 4.0 system. The Administrators had a fit trying to figure out my averages, until they sent to my prior school for a grading chart.
     
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