Grade Point Average (BrE equivalent)

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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Is there a British English equivalent to Grade Point Averate average?

    Thanks in advance!
    Whenever you talk about something in educational systems, it's meaningless unless you provide context as to which system, e.g. which country, level of education, etc., you are referring.

    It's all part of context.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think the simple answer is NO.
    In my day, so long ago as to be probably irrelevant any more, one could talk about the average grade on obtained in O-levels or GCE's or GED (?) or similar (nationwide exams), but there was no in-school grade number given on a regular basis from which to form the GPA that many US systems (as I understand) do.
     

    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think the simple answer is NO.
    In my day, so long ago as to be probably irrelevant any more, one could talk about the average grade on obtained in O-levels or GCE's or GED (?) or similar (nationwide exams), but there was no in-school grade number given on a regular basis from which to form the GPA that many US systems (as I understand) do.
    The Wikipedia article is informative, but it does not nearly give you an adequate description of the scoring system used in the US.

    Note that our final course grades are given as letters, with an optional +("plus"), not numbers. The conversion to a numerical score is done afterwards.

    A = 4.0
    B+ = 3.5
    B = 3.0
    C+ = 3.5
    C = 3.0
    D+ = 2.5
    D = 2.0
    F = 0.0

    One may occasionally hear "minus" used to describe a score in the lower range of a particular letter grade, but typically, only the "plus" distinction matters in college (or as BE speakers say, "university").

    Of course, I must note that we almost always receive numerical grades on a 0-100 scale on individual assignments, tests, etc. At the end of a course, we average the numerical scores based on the relative weight given to each, and then must convert them to letters and then to the numerical score used in computation of the GPA. Generally:

    90-100=A
    80-89=B
    70-79=C
    60-69=D
    59 or lower = F

    Most colleges follow this system, I think (but note that where exactly the "plus" and "minus" distinctions fall depends upon the institution). However, my high school followed a slightly different system. Of course, American secondary education is almost complete sh*te, so the scores one receives in high school mean very little to college admissions boards--it's the standardized test scores (typically one's SAT scores) that determine whether or not one will be accepted.

    I hope this helps. If the system seems a bit complicated, that's because it is.:) Of course, by the time we Americans reach the college level, we know it like the back of our hands.

    EDIT: I must also add that one's cumulative GPA (CGPA--we sometimes specify "cumulative" GPA in order to contrast it with the GPA one receives in courses in one's major field of study, but, unless otherwise indicated, GPA is the same as CGPA) is the result of averaging the numerical score, on the 0.0-4.0 scale, based on the letter grade--with or without the "plus" distinction--that one receives in each course, weighted based upon the number of credit hours one receives for the course. (Credit hours generally correspond to the number of hours one spends in a class every week. Thus, if one spends 1 hour in a course every week, one will receive 1 credit hour for the course.) An "A" in a 3-credit hour course will boost one's GPA more than an "A" in a 1-credit hour course.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Starfrown, I think you rest my case! That's not at all how it works in BrE (i.e. UK educational system - school records are based on exam results (in my era at what the US calls Grade 11 aka O-levels, and then at "Grade" 13 - aka A-levels), and not on records of grades/numbers/percentages etc given by teachers at the school. Similarly at university, it was a set of exams after 3 (or 4) years. Now it's possible that's all changed, so we can await input from a current BrE resident or even better pupil or student (q.v.).
     

    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Starfrown, I think you rest my case! That's not at all how it works in BrE (i.e. UK educational system - school records are based on exam results (in my era at what the US calls Grade 11 aka O-levels, and then at "Grade" 13 - aka A-levels), and not on records of grades/numbers/percentages etc given by teachers at the school. Similarly at university, it was a set of exams after 3 (or 4) years. Now it's possible that's all changed, so we can await input from a current BrE resident or even better pupil or student (q.v.).
    American institutions recognize that scores given by individual teachers at individual schools may not be reliable indicators of a student's potential because, needless to say, one teacher or school may be more difficult than another. Thus, every time one moves to a higher level of education (secondary to college, or college to graduate school, medical school, pharmacy school, etc.) one has to take a standardized test in order to establish a level playing field. Even our high schools require students to pass a standardized test--an easy one, mind you--to move from the 10th grade into the final two years of compulsory education. Keep in mind, though, that I'm from South Carolina, and I know that all of our states do not have the same standards. Accordingly, you must also consider individual states in this discussion! That concept may seem alien to many foreigners, but it's how we do things here in the US.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Just a couple of points.

    (1) The GPA system in the US is not uniform. Whilst the 4.00 GPA is the most common, MIT is on a 5.00 GPA scale.

    (2) As far as I know, a points system is not applied in the British education system. 16-year-olds are awarded grades from their GCSE (A*, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, U). Here in Singapore, we use still take the O levels (also with individual grades: A1, A2, B3, B4, C5, C6, D7, E8, F9), and the numerical numbers for the grades of a basket of subjects can be added up to determine entry for pre-university education.
     

    NavyBlue

    Senior Member
    Spain/Spanish
    I am so sorry about the misunderstanding!

    My question was not properly posed. I didn't provide a context because what I really wanted to know was an approximate translation into BrE, regardless of how it is calculaded.

    My attempts:

    Average mark.
    Mark grade point.

    I am really sorry about this.
     
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