Grammar, correlative conjunction

< Previous | Next >

Gauthi99

New Member
Tamil
32BD0FB8-9E7A-4301-8943-E45BC5BB892A.png
I’m a newbie here. I have got some reservations on the usage of the word, both. To the best of my knowledge, it is followed by are. But in a website I just came across the sentence, “TESOL Canada board exam is required of both native or non-native graduates with or without teaching experience”. Now in this fore-mentioned quoted sentence, I personally think the word, both should be followed by the conjunction, and in lieu of or. And I have also attached the image along with this. So I’d be grateful if you guys clear this doubt. Thanks beforehand.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think 'and' would be natural here. I feel like saying that 'or' is wrong but that would be ironic given the source! Is there some subtlety I can't see?:rolleyes:
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Welcome to the forum Gauth, but I'm afraid you haven't explained your problem too well here.

    Where do you want to use 'are'?

    My comment would be that when you use 'both' and then name both things, you should use 'and': both native and non-native speakers.

    If it is either X or Y, then it is NOT 'both.
     

    Gauthi99

    New Member
    Tamil
    Welcome to the forum Gauth, but I'm afraid you haven't explained your problem too well here.

    Where do you want to use 'are'?

    My comment would be that when you use 'both' and then name both things, you should use 'and': both native and non-native speakers.

    If it is either X or Y, then it is NOT 'both.
    Thank you so much, actually this is what I want to clarify.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top