Grammar term...

Merle

Senior Member
English
Please, what is the "trick" called when, in a sentence, you attribute human qualities to a non-human entity.

EX: "Linguistics considers itself a science."

I know you're not supposed to do it...

Many Thanks
 
  • Merle

    Senior Member
    English
    Zut, I just poked around English grammar sites, and I can't find the term.

    I recently read that "personification" was a lazy writer's technique, and I thought, "oops, I do that." But there was a fancier word for the crime.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Anthropomorphism, as in Beatrice Potter's and Fritz Lang's animal characters? In the case of Walt Disney extended to even crockery and furniture. With animals, still a common foible of the English and Americans.
     

    Grop

    Senior Member
    français
    I wanted to suggest a fancy neologism: disneyfying. Alas it is present on dictionary.com with a different meaning:

    to create or alter in a simplified, sentimentalized, or contrived form or manner: museums that have become Disneyfied to attract more visitors.
    Edit: Oh, I only see now how your question is related to language. I assume saying who, he or she about a country, a tree or a vehicle would be concerned too.
     
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    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Never heard of prosopopeia before, but its definition seems very like apostrophe (and to apostrorophise), but that would mean talking to things that aren't really there (for which the little green van with yellow wheels may come and take you away).
     

    Hamlet2508

    Senior Member
    English
    Never heard of prosopopeia before, but its definition seems very like apostrophe (and to apostrorophise), but that would mean talking to things that aren't really there (for which the little green van with yellow wheels may come and take you away).
    According to various sources , it's figure of speech in which an animal or inanimate object is endowed with human traits.
     
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    Grop

    Senior Member
    français
    As I understand it, a prosopopeia would be the opposite of an apostrophe: having something that cannot talk, talk anyway. My stomach told me I was hungry.

    This doesn't apply to the first sentence.
     
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