Grammar tree of clause 'that demands too little effort from the newly unemployed to find work'

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have oneself done

New Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Context: On first hearing, this was the socially concerned chancellor, trying to change lives for the better, complete with reforms to an obviously indulgent system that demands too little effort from the newly unemployed to find work, and subsides laziness.

I don't know the grammar tree position of the to-infinitive clause to find work, here are two possible positions I guess:
1, it is the to-infinitive clause in the structure demand sth to do sth;
2, to-infinitive clause to find work is the relative clause of noun phrase the newly unemployed, or say, the to-infinitive clause postmodifies the noun phrase.
Which one is right? Or both are wrong? If so, what grammar role to find work plays?
Thanks in advance.
 
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  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Welcome to the forum, have-oneself-done!

    Where did you see this sentence? It seems very long and complicated.
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Welcome, have oneself done.

    In case it helps, I think the sentence would be more straightforwardly phrased like this:

    that demands too little effort to find work from the newly unemployed

    such that “effort to find work” goes together.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Who is doing the finding (the effort)?

    If it is for the newly unemployed, someone else could be doing the work to find jobs for them.

    If it demands work from the unemployed, then the unemployed are doing the work.
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Doji-bear is right. We demand things “from” people when we want them to do something. We demand “for” people when we want somebody else to do something for them:

    I demand justice for my neighbor.
    I demand justice from my neighbor.

    Two different things.
     

    have oneself done

    New Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    Who is doing the finding (the effort)?

    If it is for the newly unemployed, someone else could be doing the work to find jobs for them.

    If it demands work from the unemployed, then the unemployed are doing the work.
    Maybe the constituent sequence confuses me, do
    that demands too little effort to find work from the newly unemployed
    and
    that demands too little effort from the newly unemployed to find work
    have the same meaning?
    If so, for me, the former looks weird but the latter natrural.
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    Context: On first hearing, this was the socially concerned chancellor, trying to change lives for the better, complete with reforms to an obviously indulgent system that demands too little effort from the newly unemployed to find work, and subsides laziness.

    I don't know the grammar tree position of the to-infinitive clause to find work, here are two possible positions I guess:
    1, it is the to-infinitive clause in the structure demand sth to do sth;
    2, to-infinitive clause to find work is the relative clause of noun phrase the newly unemployed, or say, the to-infinitive clause postmodifies the noun phrase.
    Which one is right? Or both are wrong? If so, what grammar role to find work plays?
    Thanks in advance.
    I'd say that he infinitival clause is functioning as an adjunct of purpose in the larger structure.

    Note that we could insert “in order”, as in too little effort from the newly unemployed in order to find work.
     

    have oneself done

    New Member
    Chinese - Mandarin
    I'd say that he infinitival clause is functioning as an adjunct of purpose in the larger structure.

    Note that we could insert “in order”, as in too little effort from the newly unemployed in order to find work.
    I think I may have known where is my problem.

    I was not aware that many nouns such as effort can be postmodified by a to-infinitive clause without being subjuct or object of the to-infinitive clause.

    In the op sentence, I thought effort is neither subjuct nor object of to find work, so the to-infinitive clause cann't postmodify effort.
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think I may have known where is my problem.

    I was not aware that many nouns such as effort can be postmodified by a to-infinitive clause without being subject or object of the to-infinitive clause.

    In the op sentence, I thought effort is neither subjuct nor object of to find work, so the to-infinitive clause can't postmodify effort.
    An adjunct is a modifier in clause structure, not noun phrase structure. The infinitival "to find work" does not modify a noun, but gives the purpose of finding work. You could say that it modifies the whole verb phrase "demands too little effort from the newly unemployed"
     
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