grant me leave of absence and <oblige> [Indian English]

Li singh

Senior Member
hindi
Hi
In an application leave, I found a word, 'oblige' in a compound sentence, which confuses me a lot as I think it is used improperly and unnecessarily though it is used in the sense of 'request'. I am wrong here though. The sentence is: 'I request you to kindly grant me leave of absence for two days and oblige.'
How is the 'oblige' used' ? Do native speakes write so in a leave application?
Thanks
 
  • Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    To my knowledge, oblige rarely used as a noun. I think there should be a noun after "and". Let's wait for the explanation by our kind friends.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I've seen this before, and I think it's (very) old-fashioned commercialese: that is, a long time ago someone might write a respectful letter like this, where it in effect means "and I shall be obliged to you if you do it". But we would never write it now. It may be more current in Indian English: some phrasings are, which have become obsolete elsewhere. I can't say exactly how the verb 'oblige' gets into that grammatical position; something has been abbreviated, but I'm not sure what.
     

    Li singh

    Senior Member
    hindi
    To my knowledge, oblige rarely used as a noun. I think there should be a noun after "and". Let's wait for the explanation by our kind friends.
    The blessing on me through my threat on the usage of 'oblige' showered by some native speakers makes me understand that it is a old-fashioned style of English and feel to say a lot of thanks to them.
    And I must feel it sorry for answering that 'oblige' is not a noun, and here the word as a noun will cause a breakage in thegrammatical property( I think).
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I know this is not a recent thread but just came across it and can add to it. This expression is often used in Indian English. It was originally "oblige me" (by doing whatever favour is asked for) and at some point the "me" got left out.
     
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