grass is (always) greener

scandalously in love

Senior Member
Canada - English
Is there a french cliché that expresses a sentiment similar to the following english one...?

"The grass is (always) greener on the other side."

simplement curieuse!
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    scandalously in love said:
    Is there a french cliché that expresses a sentiment similar to the following english one...?

    "The grass is (always) greener on the other side."

    simplement curieuse!


    :arrow: The grass is (always) greener on the other side (of the fence)>>>>> On n'est jamais content de son sort

    Bye!!
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    scandalously in love said:
    Is there a french cliché that expresses a sentiment similar to the following english one...?

    "The grass is (always) greener on the other side."

    simplement curieuse!

    yes there is. l'herbe est toujours plus verte ailleurs. :)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    fetchezlavache said:
    yes there is. l'herbe est toujours plus verte ailleurs. :)

    Hi Fetchez!! What's that I found then?? What does it mean? I found it in The Cambridge dictionary English-French and it gives that phrase as an equivalent to "The grass..." :confused: :p :confused:
     

    fetchezlavache

    Senior Member
    france
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    really! that's cool... and such a literal translation.... (are you pulling my leg??? )
    yes it is. that is, i'm not. :d don't make me work too hard it's so early. i think i'm going to dive back into bed.

    hi artrella :):)... what your dictionary provided is a translation for the meaning. not the french idiom that replaces the english one. :)
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    "L'herbe est toujours plus verte chez le voisin."

    I have a hunch this French saying was originally nothing more than a loan translation from the English, anyway lots of people use it nowadays.
    There is a lot to be said for translators with little or no imagination : they contribute enormously to the enrichment of their own language!
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    Just to add yet another possibility, my dictionary (Harrap's) has "C'est toujours mieux ailleurs" as translation, another vers. of fetchez's.

    N. :)
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    This website (an exerpt of an article) has some interesting points.

    http://www.deproverbio.com/DPjournal/DP,1,1,95/GRASS.html

    The first recorded reference of "the grass is always greener" is only 1957.

    However, the Oxford Dictionary of Eng. Proverbs claims the origin is Latin ("Fertilior seges est alieno semper in arvo") which was published in English 1545 ("The corne in an other mans ground semeth euer more fertyll and plentifull then doth oure owne").

    They also have other possible origins....

    N. :)

    P.S.: (amusing piece of info) A scholar proved that optical and perceptual laws alone will make the grass at a distance look greener to the human eye than the blades of grass perpendicular to the ground.
     

    weena

    Senior Member
    français (de France)
    Ma réponse est tardive, mais je ne pense pas que "la vie est ailleurs" (phrase très mystique) traduise l'idée de "greener grass". "Greener grass" suggère qu'ailleurs, chez les autres, les choses sont mieux (par exemple, un enfant est plus gâté par ses parents que son petit voisin, ou un employé qui a plus d'avantages qu'un autre dans une autre entreprise...)
     
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