Gratitude Message

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Cereth

Senior Member
Español
Hello amigos!

Today I have to say goodbye to my japanese teachers (4), unfortunately I won´t be able to go to japanese school for a while and I want to thank them, can you help me translating this?:

I really appreciate your classes,I have learned a lot from you,and eventhough I don´t want to leave I must do it. I hope we can meet again in a future.
I don´t have enough thanking words now, but I just want to let you know
that i will never forget what you taught me.
Thank you so much.

.....nya I want to cry already....
I appreciate your help. Thank you
 
  • karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    My attempt for personal study purposes is as follows:

    xxx-sensē, anata no kurasu o hontō ni kansha shimasu. sensē kara takusan benkyō shimashita. detanakute mō, sore ga shinakute wa ikemasen desu kedo. mirai ni mata deaimashō, ne.
    ima watashi wa orē no kotoba ga jūbun ja arimasen, demo oshieru koto ga kesshite wasuremasen, sore o dake tsutaetai.
    domo arigatō gozaimashita
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    xxx-sensē, anata no kurasu o sensē-no go-shidō-ni hontō ni kansha shimasu.
    Pronoun "anata" should be avoided (sounds like examining) for the sake of politeness. The object for kansha-suru should be governed by -ni particle. Since kurasu means a place or a framework where the act of teaching happens, I substituted it with shidō (指導) or teaching, instructions or directions.

    sensē kara -no moto-de takusan benkyō shimashita.
    Your original was, "I studied from you." I replaced it with, "sensē-no moto-de," which is roughly "[studied] under your auspices."

    detanakute mō, sore ga shinakute wa ikemasen desu kedo.
    I am not sure how to salvage this part. Here is my rewrite:

    fuhon'i nagara saranakereba narimasen.
    Even though unwilllingly, I have to leave.

    mirai ni mata deaimashō, ne.
    shōrai mata aetara ī desu-ne.
    If we could meet again in the future, it would be nice.

    Your choice mirai generally denotes future in technical sense (grammar, physics etc.). The time which is yet to come to pass in one's life is shōrai (将来). I prefer au (potential form aeru) to deau because the latter means "meeting someone by chance for the first time."

    ima watashi wa orē no kotoba ga jūbun ja arimasen, jūbunna orē-no kotoba-ga arimasen.
    The contracted form "ja arimasen" is okay in speech but it is rather awkward in written language. I also want to direct your attention that -na particle is used to adjectivise a lot of Sino-Japanese morphemes.

    demo oshieru oshiete itadaita (oshiete moratta) koto ga wa, kesshite wasuremasen. sore o dake tsutaetai tsutae takatta-no desu.
    Perfect tense is preferrable for "teach." Also, the beneficiary of the act should be expressed too. I did so by using an auxiliary verb to indicate the active of the main verb is directed at the speaker (itadaku or morau).

    dōmo arigatō gozaimashita
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    Thanks Flaminius. That was more than I had hoped for. Truly it is an important topic that we should know as students – how to properly thank our teachers. I realized that I know only phrases gokurosama and otsukaresama but these are not applicable when speaking with superiors. I could only think about kansha suru hoping that it won't be offensive. Are there any other set phrases for expressing gratitude to the teacher?

    Is it possible to connect sore dake... to the previous sentence as a subclause? Is this correct: ...kesshite wasurenai no dake tsutae takatta no desu.

    Addition: Also with subclause construction, do we need to use the past tense anymore? tsutaetai n desu?
     

    Cereth

    Senior Member
    Español
    Karuna and Flam thank you sou much for your help, I said my own message to them yesterday, because nobody answered yesterday ^^

    and Crises I think this is a forum where most of people who ask have a very-low japanese level and if we ask is because we don´t have any idea of how to say it.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    sensē kara -no moto-de takusan benkyō shimashita.
    It's just that 先生から勉強する is a bad collocation. 先生から学ぶ is perfectly OK.
    Is it possible to connect sore dake... to the previous sentence as a subclause? Is this correct: ...kesshite wasurenai no dake tsutae takatta no desu.
    The first one, yes. You can use either "koto" or "no" to connect infinitive to it. To answer the second one, no, it's grammatically OK but not natural. kesshite wasurenai (darou) koto wo tsutae takatta no desu.

    Addition: Also with subclause construction, do we need to use the past tense anymore? tsutaetai n desu?
    You can say either. If you say it near the end of a letter, you should choose the past tense.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Is it possible to connect sore dake... to the previous sentence as a subclause? Is this correct: ...kesshite wasurenai no dake tsutae takatta no desu.
    This is grammatically incorrect.

    You can use either "koto" or "no" to connect infinitive to it.
    cheshire, I don't understand what you call infinitive in Japanese grammar. Perhaps you could explain with examples?

    kesshite wasurenai (darou) koto wo tsutae takatta no desu.
    This sentence seems to me suffering from awkwardness, if not grammatical errors. Off the top of my head, I would say Japanese does not have a very sophisticated way to make a subordinate clause out of a sentence whose main verb expresses intention of the speaker.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    cheshire, I don't understand what you call infinitive in Japanese grammar. Perhaps you could explain with examples?
    wasurenai koto
    I had the dictionary form in mind, like "wasureru. taberu. nomu." but I don't know how do you call it for Japanese grammar. 連体形? 終止形? What do you call it in English?

    This sentence seems to me suffering from awkwardness, if not grammatical errors. Off the top of my head, I would say Japanese does not have a very sophisticated way to make a subordinate clause out of a sentence whose main verb expresses intention of the speaker.
    I felt it too, but I was pressed for time when I wrote it, sorry.

    kesshite wasurenai (darou) koto wo tsutae takatta no desu.​

    Kesshite wasurenai darou toiu という koto wo...​
    Adding という would solve the awkwardness. As you said, 「日本語は頭でっかちな構文を嫌う」(主語が長かったりするのは避けられる)
     

    karuna

    Senior Member
    Latvian, Latvia
    I am getting confused. So, how can we say "Thank you for x" in Japanese? Do we use postposition "o" with "arigatō"?

    How about this: x wa kesshite wasuremasen yo. zembu o arigatō gozaimshita.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    I am getting confused. So, how can we say "Thank you for x" in Japanese? Do we use postposition "o" with "arigatō"?
    Sorry for a belated reply.

    If x is a noun, using postposition -o is the most appropriate construction.
    E.g., チョコレートをありがとう
    Thank you for the chocolate.

    If x is a clause, however, ありがとう should immediately follow a verb in te-form with くれて.
    E.g., ほめてくれてありがとう
    Thank you for praising me (speaking highly of me).

    Since ありがとう is an interjection and not a word in the usual sense, there are things that cannot be done with it (like following "[clause] koto-o").

    How about this: x wa kesshite wasuremasen yo. zembu o arigatō gozaimshita.
    Zembu and arigatō is not a good collocation. An oft-used adverb for conveying the same meaning is いろいろ; いろいろ(と)ありがとうございました。
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    Cereth san

    ”先生”を主語にする方が better です。日本語では ”私” は なるべく 言わない方が
    よいのです。

    先生にいろいろ 教えていただいて 感謝しています。 ”私は 学ぶ” より ”先生が
    教える” 立場を変えて 考えてください。

    Hiro Sasaki
     
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