"greasy spoon"

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Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

"Let's go to the greasy spoon for lunch today because it's before payday."

"greasy spoon"
This means a cheap restaurant, doesn't it?
Is it commonly used.
 
  • Umeboshi said:
    Hello.

    "Let's go to the greasy spoon for lunch today because it's before payday."

    "greasy spoon"
    This means a cheap restaurant, doesn't it?
    Is it commonly used.
    Hello Umeboshi,
    Courtesy Merriam-Webster's:

    Main Entry: greasy spoon Pronunciation Guide
    Function: noun
    Date: circa 1925
    : a dingy small cheap restaurant

    dingy = dirty/unclean
    greasy = fatty/oily

    One small correction: I would say "Let's go to a greasy spoon ..." unless you are referring to a particular one which in that case you can use "Let's go to the greasy spoon ..." This latter sentence implies that all parties know which restaurant you are referring to.

    drei
     

    T.D-K

    Senior Member
    Cymraeg Cymru
    Greasy spoon doesn't necessarily mean a cheap restauarant. In the UK it is used to describe the plethora of breakfast bars in the fifties and sixties, where animal fat was used rather than cooking oil and it was common place that the staff were in such a rush to satisfy the hungry workforce and without a modern day dish washing machine, the "clean" cutlery offered for use would invariably be greasy.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    For some reason I had always assumed this was an English expression - I suppose I was thinking of our Chippies (Fish and Chip Cafés).

    But no, the origin is US
    greasy spoon (restaurant) slang (orig. U.S.), a cheap and inferior eating-house.
    1925 Writer's Monthly June 486/2 *Greasy spoon, a low~class restaurant.
     

    rsweet

    Senior Member
    English, North America
    panjandrum said:
    For some reason I had always assumed this was an English expression - I suppose I was thinking of our Chippies (Fish and Chip Cafés).

    But no, the origin is US
    greasy spoon (restaurant) slang (orig. U.S.), a cheap and inferior eating-house.
    1925 Writer's Monthly June 486/2 *Greasy spoon, a low~class restaurant.
    Thanks, panjandrum :eek: ... I think.
     

    T.D-K

    Senior Member
    Cymraeg Cymru
    Well done Panjandrum. Must have been imported to us during the second world war!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    A "greasy spoon" brings to mind images of 'rough' canteens or dining establishments (I hesitate to say 'restaurant') where the spoon for stirring one's tea (one always took a lot of sugar in one's tea) was attached to a wall beside the counter by a chain - to discourage the clientele from walking off with it.
     

    T.D-K

    Senior Member
    Cymraeg Cymru
    There are a few such establishments within walking distance of Kings Cross Station even today. So Channel Tunnel travellers will have an experience to encounter when the High Speed link is finished.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'm not a great fan of Wiki, but the Greasy Spoon entry seems quite perfect (from a UK perspective). CLICK HERE.

    T.D-K said:
    There are a few such establishments within walking distance of Kings Cross Station even today. So Channel Tunnel travellers will have an experience to encounter when the High Speed link is finished.
    You should be planning the Gastro-Tours now! You could make up a package to include treatment in one of London's premiere NHS A&E departments. A kind of low-cost alternative to colonic irrigation.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    I recall that when I was in San Fransisco many moons ago, there was a restaurant near Fisherman's Warf, I think, which called itself La cuillère graisseuse.
     
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