great motivation

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squidink

Senior Member
Venezuela, Spanish
Hi.

Which sentence is correct?
He has showed a great motivation for learning grammar.

He has showed great motivation for learning grammar.
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hi.

    Which sentence is correct?
    He has showed a great motivation for learning grammar.

    He has showed great motivation for learning grammar.
    Neither.
    He has shown (a) great motivation ...
    He showed (a) great motivation ...

    I would prefer to omit the article, but others may not.

    Do you have motivation for something?
    I think perhaps not.
    I think you have motivation to something, so I would end the sentences:
    ... to learn grammar.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Neither.
    He has shown (a) great motivation ...
    He showed (a) great motivation ...

    I would prefer to omit the article, but others may not.

    Do you have motivation for something?
    I think perhaps not.
    I think you have motivation to something, so I would end the sentences:
    ... to learn grammar.
    Hi, panjandrum

    I am curious about which preposition should go with motivation, because my dictionary only lists motivation for as a stock usage. I wonder if both of them are acceptable in English?
     
    Neither.
    He has shown (a) great motivation ...
    He showed (a) great motivation ...

    I would prefer to omit the article, but others may not.

    Do you have motivation for something?
    I think perhaps not.
    I think you have motivation to something, so I would end the sentences:
    ... to learn grammar.
    I disagree. I think you have a motivation for something not to something, maybe to do something. I would say:

    He has shown great motivation for learning grammar.

    (if you don't add "a" in there, i think it implies a broader motivation, rather then specific.)

    I'm sorry if that's not clear, I'm not exactly sure how to describe it.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    He was highly motivated to learn grammar. (I prefer this one.)

    He showed great motivation for the learning of grammar.
     

    teacup2

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    I wonder if it is Ok to continue an old thread.
    I am reading a text where it says that "X.X’s strong motivation to rural sociology was based on his life experiences..."
    and am wondering about the preposition motivation TO. Could/Should it be FOR, as there is a noun and not a verb (like in Packard's examples above)?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I find that sentence strange.
    You have a motivation to <action of some kind>, not a motivation to a subject.
    So, X.X might have a strong motivation to study rural sociology, or to work in the area of rural sociology, but not a strong motivation "to rural sociology".
     

    teacup2

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    I was also thinking the verb "study", but "to work in" would sound even better. Now I know how to use the term, thank you very much!
     
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