greater

azz

Senior Member
armenian
What does "the greater glory of God" mean?

We sing to the greater glory of God.

Why the comparative?

a. I am not thinking of the beauty of the mountains. I am thinking of the greater beauty of the sea.

Is a grammatical?
 
  • EVAVIGIL

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    The way I see it:
    God already has great glory; we sing to His greater glory. :)
    I don't know if that sounds clear at all... :confused:
    Just trying to help!
    Cheers!
    EVA.
     

    mirandolina

    Senior Member
    Scotland - English
    It's the translation of the Latin "Ad majorem Dei gloriam" which is the motto of the Jesuits. As you can see, the comparative is already in the Latin.
    You can find out more if you type or paste the Latin into the Google search engine.
     

    CubaCelt

    Member
    Ireland, English
    To the greater glory.... means to improve or contribute to the glory of or to add to the glory of....
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you all.

    This sentence is correct though isn't it?

    a. I am not thinking of the beauty of the mountains. I am thinking of the greater beauty of the sea.


    Hi CubaCelt,
    Could you give me another example where the comparative is used in this way? Or is this a set expression imported from Latin?
     

    CubaCelt

    Member
    Ireland, English
    azz said:
    Thank you all.

    This sentence is correct though isn't it?

    a. I am not thinking of the beauty of the mountains. I am thinking of the greater beauty of the sea.


    Hi Azz
    The two sentences you’ve given does not sound correct. You are not comparing like with like. What you are doing is expressing a preference. In your opinion you prefer looking at the sea while someone else might prefer the mountains.

    You need to say why you prefer the sea to the mountains.
    I would rather the breaking waves of the sea than the cold mist of the mountains.
    Or: I am not thinking of the immobile mountains but the swirling turbulent sea.

    In both of these sentences you are compaing an aspect of each one. In that way the comparison is valid.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    azz said:
    Thank you all.

    This sentence is correct though isn't it?

    a. I am not thinking of the beauty of the mountains. I am thinking of the greater beauty of the sea.

    It sounds fine to me.
     

    nmgadb

    Senior Member
    English - US
    azz said:
    This sentence is correct though isn't it?

    a. I am not thinking of the beauty of the mountains. I am thinking of the greater beauty of the sea.


    Sounds correct to me too! Sounds like you acknowledge that the mountains are beautiful, but you think that the sea is more beautiful. Nothing wrong, grammatically, with that!
     

    CubaCelt

    Member
    Ireland, English
    nmgadb said:
    Sounds correct to me too! Sounds like you acknowledge that the mountains are beautiful, but you think that the sea is more beautiful. Nothing wrong, grammatically, with that!

    Reading your reply I would have to concede that the sentences are perhaps gramattically correct. However I don't think the view is expressed in a way you would hear it in normal speech.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    CubaCelt said:
    Reading your reply I would have to concede that the sentences are perhaps gramattically correct. However I don't think the view is expressed in a way you would hear it in normal speech.

    I suppose we'd better agree to disagree then, because to me it sounds like a particularly nice way of expressing yourself.:(
     

    EVAVIGIL

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    CubaCelt said:
    Hi Azz
    The two sentences you’ve given does :cross: not sound correct. You are not comparing like with like. What you are doing is expressing a preference. In your opinion you prefer looking at the sea while someone else might prefer the mountains.

    You need to say why you prefer the sea to the mountains.
    I would rather the breaking waves of the sea than the cold mist of the mountains.
    Or: I am not thinking of the immobile mountains but the swirling turbulent sea.

    In both of these sentences you are compaing an aspect of each one. In that way the comparison is valid.

    The two sentences you've given do not sound correct...
    Cheers!
    EVA.
     
    Top