Green roof is

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sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
Self-made sentence:

"Green roof is a type of roof that grows plants on top of a building."

Is it correct to use "green roof" as a collective noun, which is uncountable as in the above sentence?
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "Green roof" can't be uncountable as it is a roof! I would expect to see "A green roof..." (as in Wikipedia).
    I would also add that roofs don't grow plants, gardeners do. So I would prefer "that has plants growing on it." A roof is already on the top of a building.

    It is possible that if the roof has been trademarked (i.e. Green roof®), you might write it without an indefinite article.
     
    Last edited:

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    If 'Green roof' is a brand name, then, yes. But judging by the lack of capitalisation it isn't a brand name, so, no.

    If you're looking to define a term, then you can pluralise it, 'Green roofs are ....', or you can use an indefinite article, 'A green roof is ...' . (Cross-posted)
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If 'Green roof' is a brand name, then, yes. But judging by the lack of capitalisation it isn't a brand name, so, no.

    If you're looking to define a term, then you can pluralise it, 'Green roofs are ....', or you can use an indefinite article, 'A green roof is ...' . (Cross-posted)
    But I have heard people saying "what is green roof". Is it correct?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    They might say that if they've never heard the phrase.
    If you say to them that you are going to get a green roof, they are more likely to say "What's a green roof?", although they could say (probably less likely) say "What do you mean by green roof?"
     
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