Greensboro <be> closer to the mountain

MariReg

Member
German
Can someone help me if this sentence is correct in spoken English? Specifically in the use of "be". Thanks!
"Okay, back east, you know we got the coast, you know, we kind of closer to the coast around here [you know, but] um, Greensboro be closer to the mountain."
 
  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Also, in standard English it would also be "Greensboro is closer to the mountains."
     

    MariReg

    Member
    German
    Does anyone know what "be" refers to? Is it " I am" or " I will be"? Thanks!
    context:
    A: What does that mean?
    B: [That mean like], okay like, say you're doing something and it's getting on my nerves. I be like, you dragging like, [you doing too much, basically.]
     

    MariReg

    Member
    German
    In this context, it means the same as 'is'. See my post #2.
    Thanks a million, Does it mean that he says that regularly? Because to me that "be" above mainly is to do with a kind of constant state but this "be" in "I be like" looks different, do you agree?
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In his dialect, he would naturally say 'be' where speakers of 'standard' English would say 'is'. As Andygc points out in post #10, this is a feature of several dialects.

    It's something you should perhaps be aware of, but you'll never need to learn it, or use it. It would sound wrong if you, or I, were to use it.
     

    MariReg

    Member
    German
    In his dialect, he would naturally say 'be' where speakers of 'standard' English would say 'is'. As Andygc points out in post #10, this is a feature of several dialects.

    It's something you should perhaps be aware of, but you'll never need to learn it, or use it. It would sound wrong if you, or I, were to use it.
    Thanks, I know that these are not correct, but some "be"s in African American are used to indicate "habituality". For example, I be listening everyday. I wanted to know if this "be" indicates the same sense :)
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    The subjunctive mood denotes what is imagined, wished or possible, so that "be" in some of these cases could be in that mood.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
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