greet the day

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
What does "greeting the day" actually involve? Just waking up and thanking God for a beautiful, say sunny day?

Here's from a British short story, "Topiary," by Freya North:
[Jenny comes to a mansion to take care of a "crotchety old lady."] "When Jenny tried to actually care, she was shot down. When she attempted to greet the day, she was snubbed. Suggestions of fresh air were dismissed . . ."

This passage suggests that she greeted the day aloud somehow.

Thanks!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I suppose this means that Jenny was snubbed even when she said something simple like "Good morning" or "Isn't it a nice day?" I can't imagine what else "greeting the day" would mean in that sentence. The crotchety old lady is being mean to her no matter what she says.
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi owlman, I thought of something like "It's a beautiful day today, isn't it?" but wasn't sure, as "greet the day" suggested you turn with reverence to the day itself. But I guess this would be a way of turning to both the day and another human, and the only way of "greeting the day" aloud.

    I wonder though if I can write something like
    "She opened her eyes and greeted the day. Then she noticed the note on the nightstand."
    Would this work? Can I use "greet the day" this way?

    Thanks!
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I don't see why not, susanna76. This sounds like a literary expression used to describe somebody who wakes up and is happy about it. It's pretty vague, though. I really have no idea what "greeting the day" would mean in that sentence. Maybe it means that she smiled as she looked through the window and saw the sun shining. Maybe it means that she fell to her knees and began chanting prayers to the Sun God. Maybe... :)
     
    Last edited:

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Though I'm not sure how common it is nowadays to greet someone with the phrase 'Good day', I believe that's from where 'greet the day' derives here. In other words, I agree with owlman (post #2).
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    ESjarn, you have a point there. I agree that may be how this "greet the day" phrase originated.
    Thank you se16teddy and owlman! se16teddy: Would you think one can greet the day just by opening the curtains, for instance? I would like to use this phrase in such an instance. Thanks!
     
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