Greeting

mansio

Senior Member
France/Alsace
I am on a Muslim forum where people are rather touchy. They want me to greet them with Islamic etiquette.
So I would like to know which Arabic greeting(s) I should use at the end of my posts.
Thanks.
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You can use

    والسلام عليكم ورحمة الله وبركاته

    at the end of your posts.

    You can also use it at the beginning, without the initial و.
     

    SofiaB

    Senior Member
    English Asia
    I know elroi's greeting is the most frequently used. are these also good in this area?
    بركةالله فيك والله يبيك فيك
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    SofiaB said:
    I know elroi's greeting is the most frequently used. are these also good in this area?
    بركة بارك الله فيك والله يبيك يبارك فيك
    Yes, with the corrections above.

    It's also important to note that these are two separate greetings, one on either side of the و.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    حفظكم ربي
    حفظكم الله
    استودعكم الله الذي لاتضيع ودائعه
    في حفظ الله ورعايته
    رعاكم الله وسدد خطاكم
    اثابكم الله..ونلتقي على خير
    أترككم في حفظ الله ورعايته
     

    mansio

    Senior Member
    France/Alsace
    Thanks a lot to you all for your answers.

    I am not a Muslim so I want my greetings to be as religiously neutral as possible. I shall keep only the assalâmu 3alaykum part.

    From my study of classical Arabic I learned that I should say assalâmu 3alayka to one male person, a. 3alayki to one female person, a. 3alaykumâ to two persons (male or female??) and a. 3alaykum to several persons.

    Moreover I heard that under the influence of Western languages a form of respect has emerged that uses assalâmu 3alaykum not only for a group but also for one person. Is that true?

    I also know that when you meet people and greet them assalâmu 3alaykum they answer by reversing the greeting and saying wa 3alaykumu ssalâmu. Do I need to reverse the greeting at the end of a written post?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    mansio said:
    Thanks a lot to you all for your answers.

    I am not a Muslim so I want my greetings to be as religiously neutral as possible. I shall keep only the assalâmu 3alaykum part.
    Although "as-salaamu 3alaykum" is not explicitly religious, it is widely considered a Moslem greeting. Just so you know. :)

    From my study of classical Arabic I learned that I should say assalâmu 3alayka to one male person, a. 3alayki to one female person, a. 3alaykumâ to two persons (male or female?? two males, two females, or a male and a female - it doesn't matter) and a. 3alaykum to several persons.
    That's correct. One more:
    You would use "3alaykunna" if addressing a group of females.
    ("3alaykum" is used if addressing a group of all males or both females and males.)

    Moreover I heard that under the influence of Western languages a form of respect has emerged that uses assalâmu 3alaykum not only for a group but also for one person. Is that true?
    That is true, but I don't know if it has to do with a Western influence. :)

    I also know that when you meet people and greet them assalâmu 3alaykum they answer by reversing the greeting and saying wa 3alaykumu ssalâmu. Do I need to reverse the greeting at the end of a written post?
    No. You only reverse it as a direct response.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    mansio said:
    I shall keep only the assalâmu 3alaykum part.
    I agree with you, it's also the simplest greeting. And I personally prefer simple things :)

    3alaykumâ to two persons (male or female??) and a. 3alaykum to several persons.
    This is right, the dual form doesn't have feminine "sub-form" :) it's always "mâ". There's also 3alaykunna for plural feminine.
    But, the common usage is to say as-salamu 3alaykum even to one person, male or female. You can consider this plural form as the French "vous" of respect.

    Moreover I heard that under the influence of Western languages a form of respect has emerged that uses assalâmu 3alaykum not only for a group but also for one person. Is that true?
    Yes :) see above. But I'm not sure about the western languages' effect here.

    I also know that when you meet people and greet them assalâmu 3alaykum they answer by reversing the greeting and saying wa 3alaykumu ssalâmu. Do I need to reverse the greeting at the end of a written post?
    No, in writing you only "reverse" it when you're answering someone's greeting.

    The idea is not exactly to reverse, but this is the structure to say "and to you too". It's used for any king of replying to wishes :
    - baaraka Allahu fiika بارك الله فيك God bless you
    - wa fiika وفيك And you too

    - atamanna laka 3aaman sa3idan أتمنى لك عامًا سعيدًا I wish you a happy year
    - wa laka aydan ولك أيضًا And to you too
    and so on...
     

    Rosa Fernandez

    Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Could somebody explain what's the difference between the expressions "baraka allahu fik" and "allah yubarik fik"?

    I think I know how to use them in Moroccan darija (the first one to say "thank you" and the second one as an answer to the first or to any other expression containing the verb b-r-k. Is it the same in fusha?.

    I also wonder if the expression "tbarak allah aleik/aleih/ha, etc", which Moroccans use a lot (especially for children, but also for grown-ups meaning "bravo aleik" (eg)) is used in fusha.

    Shukran jazeelan!
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Rosa Fernandez said:
    Could somebody explain what's the difference between the expressions "baraka allahu fik" and "allah yubarik fik"?
    Basicaly, there is no difference. Although the first one is mostly used with wishes : verb+Allah+"the wish" :
    Baaraka Allahu fikaa
    Shafaaka Allahu
    RaHimahu Allahu
    But the other form is also used :
    Allah yubaarik fika
    Allah ye3Tika al-3aafeya
    Allah yesaam7ak (used in Egypt, i.e. May God forgive you, and used when you're uppset with someone but don't won't to quarrel with them, sometimes perceived as childish:) )
    I think I know how to use them in Moroccan darija (the first one to say "thank you" and the second one as an answer to the first or to any other expression containing the verb b-r-k. Is it the same in fusha?.
    In colloquial Egyptian we mostly use the second, and we use it when someone congratulates us for something, saying "mabrook".
    I also wonder if the expression "tbarak allah aleik/aleih/ha, etc", which Moroccans use a lot (especially for children, but also for grown-ups meaning "bravo aleik" (eg)) is used in fusha.
    No, this is not fusHa. The structure itself tabaaraka 3ala is not fusHa, at least I've never seen before.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Let me just add that we don't use "baaraka 'l-laahu fiika." We use the colloquial version of "allahu yubaariku fiika," that is "alla ybaarek fiik" in exactly the way Cherine described - as an answer to "mabruuk."

    We also use "alla ysaam7ak" in a similar way.
     
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