Greetings. My name is..

Qimaster

Senior Member
English
Need to know how to give a formal introduction for a goddess in rōmaji. She will be saying, 'Greetings. My name is Amaterasu Omikami.' Thank you for your help!
 
  • Qimaster

    Senior Member
    English
    Mina-no-mono, yooku-kike.
    Warekosowa, amaterasu oomikami naruzo.
    Just need to confirm.

    Would 'Mina-no-mono, yooku-kike. Warekosowa, Amaterasu Omikami naruzo.' equate to the provided txt? We notice that there are a few words that have double lettering. Is that required? Thank you.
     

    Qimaster

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi.
    "Equation" was not guaranteed.

    Just to make sure, what is "Greeting"?
    In Japan's culture, God(s) usually don't say "hello" or "Nice to meet you" or some other greetings at the top of his/her speech to human being.
    In English culture, what does he/she say as "greeting"?

    Mina-no-mono, yo(o)ku-kike
    =Everyone (you all ), listen carefully.
    =Attention.

    This is equivalent for the word-which-comes-at-the- top-of-her-speech.

    I don't think Gods say "hello" to us (human).
    In this situation she is talking to other deities.

    Can someone please give us the full utterance? A formal introduction is required.
     
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    rukiak

    Senior Member
    japanese
    >Mina-no-mono, yooku-kike. Warekosowa, Amaterasu Omikami naruzo.
    This sounds nice. This is funny. I like this.:)

    >naruzo caught my attention.
    This comment is also interestiong.:)

    Qimaster, what is the context?
    (Because it is unusual that God/Goddess gives greetings in the mythes I know. Some context is required to be responded.)
     
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    Qimaster

    Senior Member
    English
    >Mina-no-mono, yooku-kike. Warekosowa, Amaterasu Omikami naruzo.
    This sounds nice. This is funny. I like this.:)

    >naruzo caught my attention.
    This comment is also interestiong.:)

    Qimaster, what is the context?
    (Because it is unusual that God/Goddess gives greetings in the mythes I know. Some context is required to be responded.)
    She graciously introduces herself to her liberators. Originally we included a greeting, but in light of the recent aforementioned knowledge we have opted to require only 'My name is.'

    Just to confirm, would "Warekosowa, Amaterasu Omikami naruzo." suffice? Is the comma necessary?
     

    rukiak

    Senior Member
    japanese
    >would "Warekosowa, Amaterasu Omikami naruzo." suffice?
    yes.

    >Is the comma necessary?
    I think there is no problem without comma.

    Translating "My name is Amaterasu Omikami" literally, it is
    -Watashi no namae wa Amaterasu Omikami desu. (It sounds gracious.)
    -Wagana wa Amaterasu Omikami nari. (,which sounds unfriendly or haughty, but sounds like god/goddess.)
    -A ga na wa

    Other translation may be possible, which is for "I am Amaterasu Omikami."
    -watashi wa Amaterasu Omikami desu.
    -watakushi Amaterasu Omikami to moushimasuru. (,which sounds sweet, only suitable for cartoon and anime works.)
    etc.
     
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    Qimaster

    Senior Member
    English
    We will go with, "Watashi no namae wa Amaterasu Omikami desu." That was our original translation, and we really need to emphasize that she is happy to be freed. Is the phrasing accurate?

    Moderator Note:
    The question about "she was sealed away" has been moved here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
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