Grilled vs roasted bread [toast]

Tochy14

Senior Member
Hi everybody! Nate dogg says in one of his songs: "Everyday is a holliday" but it is false. Therefore I am asking you the following question,

Which word combination is the best one between:
Grilled bread / roasted bread?

(I am refering to bread slices you put in the toaster in the morning to spread jelley or strawberry jam on it).

Thank you guys
 
  • ms.creant

    Member
    english (canadian)
    Hey Tochy!

    English isn't always the most imaginative language; it would be toasted bread or, more commonly, toast.

    That said, grilling and toasting are pretty much the same thing. Roasting is in the over, whereas grilling is, well, on a grill (and a toaster is sort of like a horizontal grill).
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Bread that comes out of a toaster is called toast. The heating process to which it was subjected was neither grilling nor roasting, but toasting; it is bread that has been toasted.

    The only way to "roast" bread (a very strange idea) is to put it in an oven, or perhaps on a spit over a fire.

    One may "grill" bread (at least, in the American sense of grill) either by cooking it on a grill over coals,
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_uOL8vPc-ll4/RpEhTm6kEqI/AAAAAAAAAC0/_Zs_dKdAm5M/s400/texas+toast.JPG

    or by cooking it on a large flat "grill" of the sort one finds in restaurants.

    There is bread being "grilled" this way (it is probably the egg-soaked bread called "French toast") in this picture:
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3107/2765599923_67919173c8.jpg?v=0
     

    b1947420

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi everybody! Nate dogg says in one of his songs: "Everyday is a holliday" but it is false. Therefore I am asking you the following question,

    Which word combination is the best one between:
    Grilled bread / roasted bread?

    (I am refering to bread slices you put in the toaster in the morning to spread jelley or strawberry jam on it).

    Thank you guys
    I cannot use French to explain in this forum but you will know the term for toasted bread -- it is grilled bread.

    The way to think about it is in grilling the radiated heat is applied directly to the food, as under a grill.
    In roasting the heat is applied around the item as in an oven environment.
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    In the U.S., we call bread that has been cooked in a toaster, 'toast,' as has been pointed out. We also can call it 'toasted bread' though we don't usually use that complex a phrase. We can have 'broiled toast'--toast made in a broiler--too. That's what you make if you have an oven with a broiling rack/setting, but no toaster.

    Finally, you can make a grilled cheese--by broiling it, by pan-frying it, or by cooking it over a grill.

    A grilled cheese is simply two pieces of toasted bread, often spread with too much butter; slices of cheese have been placed on the top and broiled!

    Alternately, the bread is toasted in butter in a fry pan with the cheese on top of the slices--as the slices of bread toast ('fry' would be a better word), the cheese melts.

    At the end, you can put the slices together, to make a sandwich. Or you can have two slices on a plate with the cheese on top (this is called an 'open-faced sandwich').

    Best,

    cew
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Just to short cut any further confusion on usage in AmE and BrE.
    In the UK a heating element under which food is cooked is called a grill. In the US I believe that is called a broiler. So either can make toast by toasting one side at a time (the side facing up towards the heat).
    Roast means the same in the US and UK, although US usage seems to use the word roasted more frequently than the UK. Roast beef is "universal" but roast potatoes in the UK vs. roasted potatoes in the US.
     

    Tochy14

    Senior Member
    So what I was thinking to is "toast",

    I can get "grilled bread" by placing it on a barbecue for example,

    and (for GreenWhiteBlue) the only good idea to roast bread is to place goat cheese slices on it for example like I am used to at home when I am not in a hurry.

    ms.creant :toasters have either vertical grills as you can see here http://beingwife.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/toaster.jpg or horizontal grills http://www.chinatraderonline.com/Files/home-appliance/Sandwich-maker/indicator-light-Sandwich-Toaster-19394621913.jpg


    Thanks to all of you!!
     
    Last edited:

    Tochy14

    Senior Member
    I cannot use French to explain in this forum but you will know the term for toasted bread -- it is grilled bread.
    I am not sure I got what you said and I prefer asking the question as they are many differences between BE an AE.

    Did you say that in BE, grilled bread was the same as toast?
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    So what I was thinking to is "toast",

    I can get "grilled bread" by placing it on a barbecue for example . . .
    Yes, in U.S. English, a barbecue and a grill are one and the same--or more specifically, a barbecue-grill is a specific type of grill (other grills use gas and electric):

    http://www.fotosearch.com/photos-images/barbecue-grill.html

    The difference between a grill and a broiler is that, as Julian observes, for a broiler, the heating element is above the item being broiled; for a grill, the heating element is below the item being grilled.

    Best,

    cew
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Did you say that in BE, grilled bread was the same as toast?
    In BrE bread that has been browned on both sides by the grill (from above) is called toast. Same stuff as one gets by putting the bread in a dedicated toaster. You could put bread on to a US grill with not fat or oil and it would also get toasted just because of the hot surface. If you used oil or fat, you would probably get what is called "fried bread" in England. I don't know what it would be called in the US, if it's ever even made.
    Anyone?
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Hi, in the U.S. we must be careful because we do have something called 'fried bread' or more commonly 'fry bread:' it's a Native American recipe:
    here is one link to a recipe for "Indian Fry Bread"
    (ga-do di-gv-tsa-la-nv-hi a-yv-wi-ya):
    http://www.powersource.com/cocinc/cookbook/fry.htm

    And here is more information on it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frybread

    (Fried bread keeps your weight on when you have no money I guess!)

    But we do also fry bread (already made bread as opposed to dough) to make something called "French toast;" but first, before it is fried, the "French toast" is dipped in an egg batter.

    In New Orleans, this is called (when the name is translated from the French New Orleans name) "lost bread" (I infer from others' posts that I am not supposed to use the New Orleans name because it is in French):

    http://www.gumbopages.com/food/breakfast/pain-perdu.html

    In BrE bread that has been browned on both sides by the grill (from above) is called toast. Same stuff as one gets by putting the bread in a dedicated toaster. You could put bread on to a US grill with not fat or oil and it would also get toasted just because of the hot surface. If you used oil or fat, you would probably get what is called "fried bread" in England. I don't know what it would be called in the US, if it's ever even made.
    Anyone?

    (Ah, it's great fun to cook, but with a heart problem/infection your diet gets so restricted . . . that I don't even want to see a 'lost bread' recipe).

    Best,

    cew
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Ah yes, my first experience of Apache Fry Bread was at Four Corners - delicious with honey :) I also love French Toast (soak in extra cholesterol before frying in butter). It seems as though just frying a slice of bread in oil in a skillet or on a grill is just not done in the US. It often comprises a delicious crispy part of a "Complete English Breakfast" at country B&B's (it's low on cholesterol but high in, well, fat content).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Just wanted to say that, apart from by using a toaster or grill (broiler), I think it's also possible to make toast with a toasting fork at a fireplace or open fire.

    And if you've got a grill pan (for the stove top) and you wanted criss-crosses on your toast, I imagine you could use that too.
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Yes, people do make toast over a fire by holding the bread with a fork. At home we actually used to use a candle to toast our bread (and heat our bean dip) during the hurricanes.

    Best,

    cew
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top