griller la politesse

Denis the fatalist

Senior Member
France/French
Hi tout le monde,

do native english speakers have a home-made way of saying "griller la politesse" ?
My context deals with a kind of chess game, both competitive and fair-play, between various resistance groups which have joined together in a coordinative organisation because they agree on the aim (to free the town), but still differ by their political backgrounds and race to balance the control of the place so they will remain important in the final decisions. So every bunch tries to "griller la politesse à l'autre" but inside a sort of gentlemen's way.

And thanks !
 
  • Denis the fatalist

    Senior Member
    France/French
    well, overtake could go, however I mean that if one gets the City Hall, the other takes old of the Post office, and then the third will aim to the radio station - sharing the strategic places to have a power both at the time t and in the final negociations - besides everydays' life in politics isn't it ?
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Outmanoeuvring each other ? Stealing a march on ? For "griller la priorité a quelqu'un" we say (in BE) "to cut someone up" -slangy and figurative (you knew that) but, sadly, I don't think it could stretch to an off-road situation. In conclusion, "outmaneouvring" is my best effort. Hi foreros, outmaneouvre me.
     

    clairet

    Senior Member
    England & English (UK version)
    if "griller" basically means "take no notice of" as in amityville's example and "griller le feu rouge", perhaps "ignoring the niceties" would translate "griller la politesse" (though it doesn't meet the original description of doing it all within a polite approach).
     

    Denis the fatalist

    Senior Member
    France/French
    Then it must be that, an idiotism... Every answer is close to it but not quite ! Thank you everybody, Niceties is... nice but you're right, it won't go here ; maybe I'll try to use the upper hand. I must reckon that outmanoeuvring is a good approach in the meaning that every group makes "manoeuvres" !
     

    GayleM

    New Member
    English - American
    How about "steal someone's thunder"?
    Hi tout le monde,

    do native english speakers have a home-made way of saying "griller la politesse" ?
    My context deals with a kind of chess game, both competitive and fair-play, between various resistance groups which have joined together in a coordinative organisation because they agree on the aim (to free the town), but still differ by their political backgrounds and race to balance the control of the place so they will remain important in the final decisions. So every bunch tries to "griller la politesse à l'autre" but inside a sort of gentlemen's way.

    And thanks !
    To beat someone to the punch!
     
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