grinding and shining

sangok

New Member
German - Austria
Hello,

I stumbled over this image (might be NSFW - http://9gag.com/gag/abqy7Lb?ref=android.s.fb) and what was assigned to the letter 'L': grinding and shining.
I never heard that phrase and can't find an explanation anywhere what it's supposed to mean, not even here?

Google results are only 5 pages, so I guess it's quite rare...
Does anybody know the meaning of it?

I found two halfway decent sources:
#1 http://allisonack.blogspot.co.at/
#2 http://bladekatana.tumblr.com/

#1
Some excuse can be given to the kids of the generation behind us, because this is what they have grown up knowing. But even that is a scary thing as it is so engrained in every choice that they make. My students are consistently worried about their “branding”, how they are perceived in their on-line presence as they feel that it will determine part of their future successes. Hashtags claiming that they are scholars, grinding and shining, started from the bottom, working hard…many of them aren’t. It’s an allusion that they have gotten away with upholding because all of their friends are doing it as well and their parents are either clueless or trying to join in on the action.


#2
elemental companion: wood eel
Meaning of life: nothing but grinding and shining
the war on white racism
single homeless person
Since #1 is obviously more reliable I'd say "grinding and shining" means something like "to bite through", in a figurative meaning though.
For instance #3 http://www.onlineclarity.co.uk/learn/gua/hexagrams/hexagram21.php

The Judgement shows this pattern more clearly on a larger scale: there is 'harvest in going to law'. Litigation represents determination to reach truth, to encompass a situation and bite through its deceptions, as expressed by a whole society. And the Image uses the same concept: 'ancient kings brought light to punishments to enforce the laws.'
If you're pulling though, getting by, scraping along, barely making it, if your life is an omnipresent hassle and you have to fight for every single bit, where nothing was handed to you on a plate, it's a grinding and shining (?).
I guess I made my point..?!

#2 supports that translation. Although looking at #1 again, it could also mean that you're just pretending you're scraping along and have a hard life full of deprivation.


I'm kinda stuck now since I have no additional data to determine which one is right or at least which one can be ruled out?
Any thoughts, ideas...?

Thanks in advance
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    You're asking about the phrase "grinding and shining"?

    I'm afraid it makes no sense to me:(.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum. :)

    You wandered onto a very badly written blog apparently composed by someone who has been given a high dose of a very bad drug. It's full of nonsense and misspellings.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is not clear what it means in the article referred to by the OP, but "grind and shine" is a familiar term to me. It is used to describe the treatment of concrete to give a smooth shiny surface for floors etc:

    See, for example:http://grindandshine.com.au

    I can imagine using it metaphorically to refer to "refining" a person, or working hard to improve oneself perhaps. But who knows if this is what is meant here.
     

    sangok

    New Member
    German - Austria
    I think it means. . .

    Source : wiktionary.org

    So one has to grind to shine.
    Yes, it matches up with what Susan wrote. Ha, who whould have thought of that!

    It is not clear what it means in the article referred to by the OP, but "grind and shine" is a familiar term to me. It is used to describe the treatment of concrete to give a smooth shiny surface for floors etc:

    See, for example:http://grindandshine.com.au

    I can imagine using it metaphorically to refer to "refining" a person, or working hard to improve oneself perhaps. But who knows if this is what is meant here.
    Thanks for the link!
    Since you're the only one who is familiar with this expression + the only one from Australia so I guess it's only common there?

    I guess it's meant like this, check out the other quote!
    So you guessed right :)


    Thank you everybody!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It is not clear what it means in the article referred to by the OP, but "grind and shine" is a familiar term to me. It is used to describe the treatment of concrete to give a smooth shiny surface for floors etc:

    See, for example:http://grindandshine.com.au

    I can imagine using it metaphorically to refer to "refining" a person, or working hard to improve oneself perhaps. But who knows if this is what is meant here.
    Here in the U.S. I would expect "grind and polish".
     

    sangok

    New Member
    German - Austria
    Ah, thank you James!

    Some time ago I heard "rise and shine" on television.
    I only know this term in the context of waking somebody up (like, "rise and shine, it's a beautiful day!") but could it also be used like you would use "grind and shine/polish"?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Not that I know. "Rise and shine" is only about getting out of bed. I've always assumed the "shine" in that context refers to the person's attitude. He should have a sunny disposition: cheerful and optimistic. The person rises and shines metaphorically in the way the sun rises and shines literally.
     
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