Gritted teeth

Tarja

Senior Member
Spain, Spanish.
No consigo entender qué son los gritted teeth... ¿alguien podría echarme una mano?

Gracias.
 
  • Lizajoy

    Senior Member
    US English
    Es lo que haces cuando te ves obligado a hacer algo que no realmente no quieras hacer porque te puede hacer daño o es desagradable, etc. y aprietas los dientes y lo haces...
     

    Tarja

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish.
    Muchas gracias, Sunce, aunque me sigue quedando una duda: el rechinar de los dientes generalmente se oye, no se ve. ¿Cómo traducir entonces "not to SHOW his gritted teeth"?
     

    Conejillo

    Senior Member
    English - England / West Coast USA
    Tarja,

    the sound made with your teeth (usually when you are angry) in English is "gnashing your teeth" or "grinding your teeth" [rechinar los dientes] and you are correct, you usually hear that rather than seeing it.

    "Gritting your teeth" is an action where you clench your jaws and hold your teeth together [apretar los dientes], usually when you are scared or worried. In this case there is nothing to hear but people may see it (because it's usually like a grimace [la mueca ??] where your lips are apart).


    I hope that helps. (Sorry that I can't translate more of it into Spanish.)
     

    Tarja

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish.
    Conejillo (nice nickname, by the way!):
    From what you've just told me, I deduce that he "mantenía tensa la mandíbula", or something like that. I'm not pretty sure how will I translate that, but I think it will be something related to "tenso", or "tensión", and maybe not using the word "dientes" but "mandíbula".

    Thanks ;)
     

    Conejillo

    Senior Member
    English - England / West Coast USA
    Tarja,

    that sounds good, but if I hear that someone is "gritting their teeth" it also conveys the idea that they are either in actual pain or that they are scared/worried that something bad is about to happen.

    For example, if I'm stuck in traffic I may "clench my teeth" (or my jaws) because I'm tense or frustrated, but if I have to slam on my brakes to avoid hitting the car in front of me I'm likely to "grit my teeth".

    Another example, if I'm in the Doctor's office and they keep me waiting for a long time, I may "clench my jaws" or "grind my teeth" because I am frustrated (or impatient), but when the nurse sticks the needle in my arm to give me an injection I will "grit my teeth" so that I don't cry out. (I am gritting my teeth because I know it will hurt but I want to look brave.)
     
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