growth that <spins off> tax revenue [spin off]

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ouzhantekin

Senior Member
Turkish - Standard
Here's an excerpt from from NYtimes:

"...
Put differently, if Europe wants first-class infrastructure and a comprehensive welfare state without piling up ever more debt, governments need to shake up working habits to generate the growth that spins off tax revenue."

I would like to know what "spin off" means here in this sentence. Does the author of the article mean that Europe should change its working habits so as to create a degree of growth where the revenue obtained from tax increases in a way that it is a seperate income?

Because here (
http://www.wordreference.com/definition/spin off ) I found "spin off has such a meaning but wasn't quite sure if it is the case here as well.

Thanks in advance.

p.s. I was unsure about putting the link for the article for fear that I might go against the rules.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the author was trying to avoid a repetition of 'generates' and came up with 'spins off' as a solution. It means:

    "...governments need to shake up working habits to generate the growth that (in turn) generates tax revenue."

    I'm not sure whether this use of 'spins off' is quite standard - it seems relatively new to me, though I think I've seen it before.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Ouzhantekin,

    Interesting question.

    Infrastructure and the welfare state are produced by the government, and financed from tax revenues. If the state spends more on them without increasing taxation, clearly government debt will increase.

    Better infrastructure however can increase the economic potential of a country; it can make it easier for National Income to increase, for the country to grow. This means that higher taxes -> more government expenditure -> growth, under the right circumstances. If the government expenditure is to lead to growth, clearly working habits need to evolve and businesses need to take advantage of the new infrastructure.

    The growth which spins off tax revenue is thus, in my view, the growth resulting from productive expenditure of those revenues by the state. I don't like the expression much because 'which spins' suggests it always happens: I'd prefer 'which can spin' to highlight the possibility, rather than presenting any resulting growth as inevitable.
     

    ouzhantekin

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Standard
    I think the author was trying to avoid a repetition of 'generates' and came up with 'spins off' as a solution. It means:

    "...governments need to shake up working habits to generate the growth that (in turn) generates tax revenue."

    I'm not sure whether this use of 'spins off' is quite standard - it seems relatively new to me, though I think I've seen it before.


    Hi Ouzhantekin,

    Interesting question.

    Infrastructure and the welfare state are produced by the government, and financed from tax revenues. If the state spends more on them without increasing taxation, clearly government debt will increase.

    Better infrastructure however can increase the economic potential of a country; it can make it easier for National Income to increase, for the country to grow. This means that higher taxes -> more government expenditure -> growth, under the right circumstances. If the government expenditure is to lead to growth, clearly working habits need to evolve and businesses need to take advantage of the new infrastructure.

    The growth which spins off tax revenue is thus, in my view, the growth resulting from productive expenditure of those revenues by the state. I don't like the expression much because 'which spins' suggests it always happens: I'd prefer 'which can spin' to highlight the possibility, rather than presenting any resulting growth as inevitable.
    After reading both replies I got the notion that "spin off" here means to "to trigger" or "to put the tax revenue" in good use. Shall I interpret it this way?
    And secondly, can anyboy come up with a sentence where "spin off" is used, having a similar meaning so that I can reinforce what I just learned ? :)

    Your replies are deeply appreciated.

    Cheers.
     
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