Guadagnare/perdere la stima

DanyD

Senior Member
Italiano, Italy
Hi all!

How do you say "perdere/guadagnare la stima" in English?

E.g.: "Facendo volontariato, si è guadagnato la mia stima"
"Ha perso la mia stima"

Thanks!
 
  • ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I think we usually use "respect" in that context.

    I've lost all respect for him since I found out he cheats on his wife.

    I have gained respect for him since I learned that he volunteers at a homeless shelter.

    He gained my respect by standing up to his corrupt boss.

    You can also say say that someone has "gone up/down in your estimation."

    "He's really gone up in my estimation since he started feeding stray dogs."

    The most direct translation of "stima" -- "esteem" -- sounds quite formal and is not frequently used in casual speech.

    "I hold you in the highest esteem." (You might say this to an ex-boyfriend or girlfriend as part of the speech where you say you just want to be friends.)
     

    DanyD

    Senior Member
    Italiano, Italy
    Perfectly clear as ever! Thanks Elaine!

    Is it true that you can also say "She's grown on me"? If so, what's the opposite, mantaining the structure?
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    You can say "she's grown on me" but that's more a question of simpatia, of liking someone, than it is of "stima."

    Someone can grow on you, even if they haven't "guadagnato la tua stima." For example, you might say, "She's really lazy and has a bad habit of not paying her share of the bills, but she's so amusing that she's grown on me."

    As for the opposite, good question!

    You can say someone is "starting to wear on me" (I used to like him, but he's so critical that he's starting to wear on me), but I can only see using that in the gerund form ("he's wearing on me"), so it's not a perfect match.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    You're welcome!

    Your question about the opposite of "she's grown on me" is a good one, and I hope someone else has some ideas.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    DanyD said:
    Perfectly clear as ever! Thanks Elaine!

    Is it true that you can also say "She's grown on me"? If so, what's the opposite, mantaining the structure?
    To go off someone or to slowly go off someone is generally used as the opposite of to grow on someone.

    It's funny how you can like someone a lot and then slowly go off them.
    I've really gone off her since I discovered that she's tight with money.
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    ElaineG said:
    You're welcome!

    Your question about the opposite of "she's grown on me" is a good one, and I hope someone else has some ideas.
    How about: I've grown tired of him, or I'm over him.
     
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