Guantanamo

geraldzajd

New Member
English, USA
I was searching for the meaning of the word "Guantanamo" as in Guantanamo Bay. Does this word have a meaning in it's native language? Where does this word come from and why was it chosen to disignate the particular area where it is used?
 
  • Gatamariposa

    Senior Member
    UK - English (native), Spanish, French
    Welcome to the Forum, sadly, I fear that I know as little as you on the subject asked, persist though I am sure there is someone out there who can help!

    Gatamariposa :)
     

    geraldzajd

    New Member
    English, USA
    Thanks for the reply and thanks for the greeting. Your log on id is similar to the word origin I'm looking for. I am in Maryville, TN, located just south of Knoxville. I am probably the only person in the world who is wondering why that area was named the way it is. Sometimes I hear word used so often in the news, I wonder if it has a meaning in it's native language. Take the word "America". I always thought it was the most beautiful word in the english language. It just seems to flow beautifully. It is also a reserved word, sort of speak, as beautiful as it is, you do not hear of many children being named "America" It would be a beautiful name if it were not also the name of my country. How did the people who founded this country come up with that name? Maybe I am just biased because I live in America, but I don't think so. Other countries names just are not as nice. Take Uraguay, Checkoslovakia, or Ubekistan for instance. I know I spelled these wrong but I think you get my meaning.
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    I do not know where does Guantánamo come from. I assume from an indian language. certainly not from Spanish.

    I assume you know America (the same in Spanish, América), the name of your continent, come from Americo Vespuccio, an Italian.
     

    geraldzajd

    New Member
    English, USA
    Thank you, I looked long and hard in google but I could not find what you found. I had a feeling it was a word used by the natives. Have a good day.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    geraldzajd said:
    Take the word "America". I always thought it was the most beautiful word in the english language. It just seems to flow beautifully. It is also a reserved word, sort of speak, as beautiful as it is, you do not hear of many children being named "America" It would be a beautiful name if it were not also the name of my country. How did the people who founded this country come up with that name? Maybe I am just biased because I live in America, but I don't think so. Other countries names just are not as nice. Take Uraguay, Checkoslovakia, or Ubekistan for instance. I know I spelled these wrong but I think you get my meaning.

    What do you mean by "nice"? :confused:

    Uraguay = Uruguay
    Ubekistan = Uzbekistan
    Checkoslovakia = no longer Czechoslovakia, but the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic / Slovakia. In any case, those are only their English names ...

    "America" wasn't originally an English word at all, as Fernando has pointed out - it originated with the Italian navigator Americo Vespuccio.

    Stick around on the forums. There's a lot to be learnt here.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Just a quibble-- it's Amerigo Vespucci. Accent on the EEgo and OOtchy. And that isn't as funny-sounding as Uruguay and Uzbekistan?
    .
     
    I think you're certainly biased! I'm from Uruguay and it sounds lovely to me! America also sounds good to me. That's maybe because I am American too. Well, maybe we're all biased, but if you say that another country's name sounds bad you should add "to me", because it's a pretty subjective issue. Isn't it?

    Regards.
     
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