guarded condition

  • Tan Z

    New Member
    Chinese
    Please give us the full sentence so that we have some idea of what you mean.
    Just " discharge condition: guarded" . It must omit some words. I guess it describes about the patient is guarded before being disharged. But I do not know about " guarded" exactly.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Just " discharge condition: guarded" . It must omit some words. I guess it describes about the patient is guarded before being disharged. But I do not know about " guarded" exactly.
    Not likely. The word is often applied to a prognosis. It means that the prognosis for the patient is uncertain, and perhaps not that great.
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    SSBE (Standard Southern British English)
    Well, that is a surprise! Baffling indeed. Never heard of that.

    Definition 2 here:
    Definition of GUARDED
    being an extremely serious condition with uncertain outcome : He was in guarded condition after the crash

    And there's me thinking he was being discharged handcuffed, ready to be sent back to jail under the watchful eye of a warder...
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's commonly used in news articles in the US for people hospitalized with a serious medical situation who are somewhat stable but whose ultimate prognosis is still not fully clear. (The "turn for the worse" could be lurking around the corner.) So the weird thing to me in the OP is that no one in guarded condition is in a position to be discharged. They might or might not make a recovery, which is hardly the situation to be considering discharging someone.
     
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    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's commonly used in news articles in the US for people hospitalized with a serious medical situation whose prognosis is still not fully clear. (The "turn for the worse" could be lurking around the corner.) So the weird thing to me in the OP is that no one in guarded condition is in a position to be discharged. They might or might not make a recovery, which is hardly the situation to be considering discharging someone.
    The patient may not be ill enough to keep in the hospital (especially these days, when they get you out the door as fast as they can), but the expected long-term outlook for their illness may not be positive, or may be simply unclear. It may not be a life-threatening illness at all. "Guarded" isn't so much a condition as a prognosis.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I've always understood it to mean:

    - If they don't die in the next couple of days, they'll probably be okay and make a recovery.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    A guarded prognosis means that the person making the determination does not have enough information to be definite.
     
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