guerilla cats

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Sophii

New Member
français
Hello !
Je travaille sur une version, un texte de Michael Innes, et j'ai du mal avec certaines expressions même quand j'essaie de les traduire au plus juste :confused:

J'ai "Even well-trained guerrilla cats have their nosy moments." que j'ai traduit en "Même les chats sauvages surentraînés [...]

Vous auriez des conseils, des corrections ? :D Merci !
[...]
Even with the context it's weird... "Appleby stopped in his tracks. The scream rang out a third time, rose to a yell, died away to an indescribable gurgle. Appleby grinned. Even well-trained guerrilla cats have their noisy moments."
 
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  • AsifAkheir

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    [...]
    Guerrillas are supposed to be stealthy - this one was screaming (why is unknown to me but perhaps it's clear somewhere else in the narrative).
    A cat is just a rather passé, hip way of saying a guy. Jazz musicians of the 40s or 50s would use the expression to feel superior to the squares.

    So translated in plain English:
    Even men who are well-trained in guerrilla tactics [...]

    It seems to me that it's being said in an ironic tone. Am I right?
     
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    Omelette

    Senior Member
    UK English
    No, this isn't - outdated - slang. These are real cats. The previous paragraph starts ' Miss Dearlove owned cats. Numbers of these were following Appleby. Every now and then...the feline force would grow'.
    He had thought the cats were ambushing him. It's comic :)
     
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    Omelette

    Senior Member
    UK English
    That's a mistake. They aren't 'des chats sauvages' they are domestic cats - pets - which are owned by a lady who lives in a rather grand house.
    Cats which - for the purposes of comedy - the protagonist fears might be dangerous.
    petit1's translation sounds quite good to me.
     
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