guest actress/actor vs cameo appearance

hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, everyone:

(1)He was a guest actor.
(2)He made a cameo appearance.


Could you please tell me whether the two sentences deliver the same message?

Best wishes.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi, everyone:

    (1)He was a guest actor.
    (2)He made a cameo appearance.


    Could you please tell me whether the two sentences deliver the same messange?

    Best wishes.
    I've actually never heard of a "guest actor", Hly. I suppose someone making a "cameo appearance" could be considered a guest actor but that's a strange phrase to me so I'm not sure that the two sentences say the same thing. Where did you come by the term "guest actor"?
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Hi, Dimcl:

    It's from a thread in a translation forum, discussing about how to translate the actor/actress who makes a camero apperance in a movie or a Tv drama into english.

    :)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi, Dimcl:

    It's from a thread in a translation forum, discussing about how to translate the actor/actress who makes a camero apperance into english.

    :)
    Well, the only phrase I'm familiar with is "cameo". As I said previously, I suppose one could consider an actor who makes a cameo a "guest actor" but I don't think it would be immediately apparent to a native-speaker what you meant.
     

    arturolczykowski

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I Thought that cameo is a famous person (often a film director) who appears in the film whereas a guest actor is usually a famous actor who appears in comedy seguel or something like that.
     

    squealer

    New Member
    USA, English
    I think a cameo appearance is made by someone who is extremely well-known, especially in another field of work. They often go uncredited.

    On the other hand, a guest actor/star plays a more notable role, and sometimes their character reoccurs in the TV series.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    I think I've got it.

    Michael Schumacher made a cameo in the movie Cars.

    Many famous actor/stars were invited to be guest actors/actresses in the TV series "Friends".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    A "guest appearance" is usually made by a "guest star."

    A cameo (appearance) is very, very short, like one scene.

    Just a note... I have been told that a cameo appearance is as much a financial "loophole" as anything. When stars reach a certain level, they cannot afford to take a part for anything less than what they were paid for their last role. If they do, it de-values them on the "market" known as Hollywood. One of the few exceptions to this rule is a cameo appearance. Because of its limited duration, it is not included in the financial calculations of star power and box office value done by the studios and agencies.

    This is how it was explained to me by a Hollywood agent. I wish I could find an online reference to back up this explanation.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    A guest actor may have a significant part, perhaps even be the star of the show for the time that they are on the show but a cameo is a fleeting appearance.
    I suspect that the origins are with the cameo locket that contained only one single likeness. A single scene or even a single frame may constitute a cameo but a guest may hog the limelight all night.

    .,,
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    A "guest appearance" is usually made by a "guest star."

    A cameo (appearance) is very, very short, like one scene.
    It seems to me I've see guest star used in the credits to a movie. The Wikipedia article for Guest star does indeed show that it happened at least once:

    "Counterintuitively enough, there is even at least one instance of a 'guest star' in a movie; James Stewart was billed as 'Guest Starring' in the Don Siegel/John Wayne film The Shootist."
     
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