Guide-conférencier(ère)

PERSEE

Senior Member
French, France
Hi everyone,

I can't find a translation for "guide-conférencier(ère)" in any dictionary, big or small. How do you English-speakers out there call the "guides" (the human ones, I mean) that do lectures in museums, moving small groups around and showing them the art works?

It seems that "guide" in English applies more to "tourist guides" or the kind that lead you through forests or mountains (in French, guide touristique, guide de montagne, etc.). And "lecturer" sounds a bit too academic, doesn't it? Even though were talking about very qualified people, a university professor would not work as a "guide-conférencier", I guess, it's not the same line of business!

Thanks for helping!
 
  • Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    "Guide" est utilisé à Ottawa:
    Guided Tours for Groups
    Permanent Collection
    $5.95 per person plus admission to the permanent collection. Minimum of 10 persons per group. Maximum of 25 persons per guide.
     

    PERSEE

    Senior Member
    French, France
    Thanks a lot, Gil.
    I guess I might as well put "guide" and leave the "lecturer" or whatever out.
     

    Squiggle

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I am dealing with exactly the same thing! In English you would normally assume the guide will speak rather than just show you the way.

    Is a guide-conférencier always qualified? In that case I could say qualified or specialist guide to emphasise how good they are.

    Many thanks
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Is a guide-conférencier always qualified?
    No, not always. Sometimes it's someone who's interested in the subject (for example, an amateur historian), and other times it might be someone who has simply been trained to give the particular tour.

    In English the differentiation is made not in the description of the guide, but in the description of the tour. If you say "a guided tour", you expect a conférencier, not someone who says "turn left here".
     

    Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    It seems that some academics do work, although usually on a voluntary basis, as "guide-conférenciers" in English-speaking countries because there is a word for them. The word is "docent".

    From the online Oxford dictionary :
    a person who acts as a guide, typically on a voluntary basis, in a museum, art gallery, or zoo.
     

    Squiggle

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Hmm, this is taking people on guided walks around historic sites in a village and explaining flora and fauna etc. Docent might be a bit too high brow.
     
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